Category: General

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, family, foster care, General, government, statistics, system failure
Sadly, Statistics Say So….
    • Every day more than 3 children die as a result of abuse and neglect. Over 75% of the child abuse fatalities were children under the age of 5.

    • Children who have been abused experience anxiety, depression, poor self-esteem, substance abuse, and even worse many contemplate or attempt suicide.

    • Over 50% of foster youth become juvenile delinquents and furthermore, commit violent crimes as adults. Studies conducted in prisons have shown that over 50% of the inmates had spent some point of their life in the foster care or juvenile system.

    • Roughly 50% of foster youth do not complete high school.

    Sources:

    California Department of Social Services Research Development Division
    UC Berkeley Center for Social Services Research

    What and How Many Children Are In American Foster Care?

    On September 30, 2004, 518,000 children were in our country’s foster care system. Most children are placed in foster care temporarily due to parental abuse or neglect.

    Average Length of Stay in Foster Care
    The average length of stay for a foster child is 2½ years. However, this figure does not include subsequent re-entries into foster care.

    Age of Children in Foster Care

    Average age: 10.1 years

    Age

    Percentage

    Younger than 1 year

    5%

    Age 1-5

    25%

    Age 6-10 years

    20%

    Age 11-15 years

    29%

    Age 16-18 years

    18%

    Over 18

    2%

    Race and Ethnicity

    As a percentage, there are more children of color in the foster care system than in the general U.S. population. Child abuse and neglect, however, occur at about the same rate in all racial and ethnic groups.

    Ethnicity

    Foster Care

    General Population

    Black, Non-Hispanic

    34%

    15%

    White, Non-Hispanic

    40%

    61%

    Hispanic

    18%

    17%

    American Indian/Alaska Native, Non-

    Hispanic

    2%

    1%

    Asian/Pacific Islander, Non-Hispanic

    1%

    3%

    Unknown

    2%

    N/A

    Two or More Races, Non-Hispanic

    2%

    4%

    Gender

    Gender

    Percentage

    Male

    53%

    Female

    47%

    Foster Homes

    In 2002, there were 170,000 foster homes nationwide.

    Adoptions

    In 2004, 59% of adopted children were adopted by their foster parents. Of children adopted in 2004, 24% were adopted by a relative.

    What Happens to Children Who Leave Foster Care as Young Adults?

    Each year, an estimated 20,000 young people age out of the U.S. foster care system. Many are only 18 years old and still need support and services. Several foster care alumni studies show that without a lifelong connection to a caring adult, these older youth often are left vulnerable to a host of adverse situations:

    Outcome

    Percentage

    Earned a high school diploma

    54%

    Obtained college bachelors degree or higher

    2%

    Became a parent 12-18 months after discharge

    84%

    Were unemployed

    51%

    Had no health insurance

    30%

    Had been homeless

    25%

    Received public assistance

    30%

    *The above information was provided courtesy of the Child Welfare League of America. For more information contact: Child Welfare League of America, 2345 Crystal Drive, Suite 250, Arlington, VA 22002, or cwla.org.

    ChildStats.Gov::

    America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2007 is one in a series of annual reports to the Nation on the condition of children in America. In this restructured report, three background measures describe the changing population of children and provide demographic context and 38 indicators depict the well-being of children in the areas of family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. Highlights from each section of the report follow.

    Demographic Background

    • In 2006, there were 73.7 million children ages 0–17 in the United States, or 25 percent of the population, down from a peak of 36 percent at the end of the “baby boom” (1964). Children are projected to compose 24 percent of the population in 2020.
    • Racial and ethnic diversity continues to increase over time. In 2006, 58 percent of U.S. children were White, non-Hispanic; 20 percent were Hispanic; 15 percent were Black; 4 percent were Asian; and 4 percent were all other races. The percentage of children who are Hispanic has increased faster than that of any other racial or ethnic group, growing from 9 percent of the child population in 1980 to 20 percent in 2006.

    Family and Social Environment

    • In 2006, 67 percent of children ages 0–17 lived with two married parents, down from 77 percent in 1980.
    • The nonmarital birth rate in 2005 increased to 48 per 1,000 unmarried women ages 15–44 years, up from 46 in 2004. The recent increases in nonmarital birth rates have been especially notable among women age 25 and older. Births to unmarried women constituted 37 percent of all U.S. births, the highest level ever reported.
    • In 2005, 20 percent of school-age children spoke a language other than English at home and 5 percent of school-age children had difficulty speaking English.
    • The adolescent birth rate for females ages 15–17 continued to decline in 2005. The rate fell by more than two-fifths since 1991, reaching 21 births per 1,000 females ages 15–17 in 2005. The 2004–2005 decline was particularly steep among Black, non-Hispanic and Asian or Pacific Islander adolescents. The birth rate for Black, non-Hispanic adolescents dropped three-fifths during 1991–2005.
    • In 2005, there were 12 substantiated reports of child maltreatment per 1,000 children.

    Economic Circumstances

    • In 2005, 18 percent of all children ages 0–17 lived in poverty; among children living in families, the poverty rate was 17 percent.
    • The percentage of children in families living below the federal poverty threshold has fluctuated since the early 1980s: it reached a high of 22 percent in 1993 and decreased to a low of 16 percent in 2000.
    • The percentage of children who had at least one parent working year round, full time rose from 77.6 percent in 2004 to 78.3 percent in 2005.

    Health Care

    • In 2005, 89 percent of children had health insurance coverage at some point during the year, down from 90 percent in 2004.
    • In 2005, 48 percent of children ages 2–4 had a dental visit in the past year, compared with 84 percent of children ages 5–11 and 82 percent of children ages 12–17. In 2003–2004, 23 percent of children ages 2–5 and 14 percent of children ages 6–17 had untreated dental caries (cavities) upon dental examination.

    Physical Environment and Safety

    • In 2005, 60 percent of children lived in counties in which concentrations of one or more air pollutants rose above allowable levels.
    • The percentage of children served by community drinking water systems that did not meet all applicable health based standards declined from 20 percent in 1993 to about 8 percent in 1998. From 1998 to 2005 the percentage has fluctuated between 5 and 10 percent.
    • In 2001–2004, about 1 percent of children ages 1–5 had elevated blood lead levels [greater than or equal to 10 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL)]. The median blood lead concentration for children ages 1–5 dropped from 14 µg/dL in 1976–1980 to about 2 µg/dL in 2003–2004.
    • In 2005, 40 percent of households with children had one or more housing problems, up from 37 percent in 2003. The most common type of housing problem is cost burden, followed by physically inadequate housing and crowded housing.
    • In 2004, the injury death rate for children ages 1–4 was 13 deaths per 100,000 children.
    • The leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits among adolescents ages 15–19 in 2003–2004 were being struck by or against an object (33 visits per 1,000 children), motor vehicle traffic crashes (25 visits per 1,000 children), and falls (20 visits per 1,000 children). Together, these causes of injury accounted for half of all injury-related emergency department visits for this age group.

    Behavior

    • The percentages of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students reporting illicit drug use in the past 30 days remained stable from 2005 to 2006. However, past month use among all three grades significantly declined since 1997.
    • In 2005, 47 percent of high school students reported ever having had sexual intercourse. This was statistically the same rate as in 2003 and a decline from 54 percent in 1991.

    Education

    • The percentage of children ages 3–5 not yet in kindergarten who were read to daily by a family member was higher in 2005 than in 1993 (60 versus 53 percent). A greater percentage of White, non-Hispanic and Asian children were read to daily in 2005 than were Black, non-Hispanic, or Hispanic children (68 and 66 percent, compared with 50 and 45 percent, respectively).
    • Between 1982 and 2004, the percentage of high school graduates who had completed an advanced mathematics course almost doubled, increasing from 26 to 50 percent. Likewise, the percentage of graduates who had completed a physics, chemistry, or advanced biology course almost doubled, increasing from 35 to 68 percent.
    • In 2005, 69 percent of high school completers enrolled immediately in a 2- or 4-year college. This rate was not statistically different than the historic high of 67 percent reached in 2004.

    Health

    • The percentage of infants with low birthweight was 8.2 percent in 2005, up from 7.9 percent in 2003 and 8.1 percent in 2004 and has increased slowly but steadily since 1984 (6.7 percent).
    • In 2005, 5 percent of children ages 4–17 were reported by a parent to have serious (definite or severe) emotional or behavioral difficulties. Among the parents of these children, 81 percent reported contacting a health care provider or school staff about their child’s difficulties, 40 percent reported their child was prescribed medication for their difficulties, and 47 percent reported their child had received treatment other than medication.
    • The proportion of children ages 6–17 who were overweight increased from 6 percent in 1976–1980 to 11 percent in 1988–1994 and continued to rise to 18 percent in 2003–2004.
    • In 2005, about 9 percent of children ages 0–17 were reported to currently have asthma, and about 5 percent of children had one or more asthma attacks in the previous year. The prevalence of asthma in children is particularly high among Black, non-Hispanic and Puerto Rican children (13 and 20 percent, respectively)
  • child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, General, law, legal, social services, system failure children
    Texas Laws on Child Abuse

    Reporting Child Abuse

    Mandated Reporting

    Texas Family Code

    261.101 Persons required to report

    A person (everyone) having cause to believe that a child’s physical or mental health or welfare has been adversely affected by abuse or neglect by any person shall immediately make a report as provided by this subchapter. This requirement to report under this section applies without exception to an individual whose personal communications may otherwise be privileged, including an attorney, a member of the clergy, a medical practitioner, a social worker, a mental health professional, and an employee of a clinic or health care facility that provides reproductive services. The identity of the reporter is confidential and may only be released by order of court or to law enforcement agency conducting a criminal investigation.

    Texas Family Code

    261.103 Report made to appropriate agency

    A report shall be made to: any local or state law enforcement agency; Child Protective Services if the alleged or suspected abuse involves a person responsible for the care, custody, or welfare of the child; the state agency that operates, licenses, certifies, or registers the facility in which the alleged abuse or neglect occurred; or the agency designated by the court to be responsible for the protection of children.

    Texas Family Code

    261.104 Contents of report

    Person making report shall identify, if known:

    name and address of child; name and address of person responsible for the care, custody, or welfare of child; and any other pertinent information concerning the alleged or suspected abuse or neglect.

    Texas Family Code

    261.106 Immunities

    Persons acting under good faith who reports or assists in the investigation of a report of alleged child abuse or neglect or who testifies or otherwise participates in a judicial proceeding arising from a report, petition, or investigation of alleged child abuse or neglect is immune from civil or criminal liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed.

    Texas Family Code
    261.107 False report
    A person commits an offense if the person knowingly makes a report under this chapter that the person knows is false or lacks factual foundation. The offense is a Class A misdemeanor (up to 1 year in jail and/or $4,000 fine).

    Texas Family Code
    261.109 Failure to report
    A person commits an offense if the person has cause to believe that a child’s physical or mental health or welfare has been or may be adversely affected by abuse or neglect and knowingly fails to report as provided in this chapter. The offense is a Class B misdemeanor (up to 180 days in jail and/or $2,000 fine).

    Child Outcry Statements

    Texas Code of Criminal Procedure 38.072

    Hearsay statement of child abuse victim
    Statements of a child under the age of 13 who is a victim of sexual offenses or assaultive offenses made to the first person 18 years of age or older are an exception to hearsay rule and that person can testify directly as to what the child said to them.

    Privileged Communications

    Civil

    Texas Family Code
    261.202 Privileged Communication
    In a proceeding regarding the abuse or neglect of a child, evidence may not be excluded on the ground of privileged communication except in the case of communications between an attorney and client.

    Criminal

    Texas Code of Criminal Procedure 38.10 Exceptions to spousal privilege
    The privilege of a person’s spouse not to be called as a witness for the state does not apply in any proceeding in which the person is charged with a crime committed against the person’s spouse, a minor child, or a member of the household of either spouse.

    Texas Rules of Criminal Evidence 503 and 505

    The privileged communications afforded by attorney/client and clergyman/ client relationships applies to criminal prosecutions except as noted in the Texas Family Code 261.101 (initial reporting).

    Statute of Limitations

    None –
    murder/manslaughter

    10 years past child’s 18th birthday –
    aggravated sexual assault of a child
    sexual assault of a child
    indecency with a child by contact

    10 years- indecency with a child by exposure

    • All persons are
      required by law to report child abuse.

    • The report can be made
      to law enforcement, Child Protective Services, or the agency regulating the
      facility where the abuse is occurring.

    • Report should contain
      name/address of child and caregiver as well as information regarding the
      abuse.

    • Information about the
      reporting person is confidential except if ordered by court or to aid law
      enforcement in their investigation.

    • Persons reporting in
      good faith are immune from civil or criminal punishment.

    • Persons making
      intentional false reports can be punished criminally.

    • Persons failing to
      make a report can be punished criminally.

    • Hearsay (statement
      made by another person) is usually not admissible in court. In cases
      where a child is a victim under 13, the first person the child told about
      the abuse 18 or over can testify to the hearsay statement.

    • There is no privileged
      communication in civil child abuse cases except for statements to your
      attorney.

    • The only privileged
      communication in a criminal child abuse case is those to your attorney and
      your clergyman.

    • A spouse or other
      family member can be compelled to testify against anyone.

    • The time that a person
      can be charged after committing sexual abuse of a child is up to 28 years
      except in cases of child death in which case there is no set time to bring
      charges after the commission of the offense.

    source: ATCCAC Home Page

    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, General, government, rape, system failure
    Foster care provider Lawrence Bright is a predator
    Default Foster care provider Lawrence Bright is a predator

    Police say 70-year-old Lawrence Bright was a licensed foster care provider, and a persistent predator.

    He lived with his girlfriend in this house on Pinnacle Road in Henrietta. There, they cared for several foster children, including the alleged victim.

    She told investigators the abuse began in 2002 when she was 13 years old….and continued for four years. She said bright raped her five times a week.

    She told investigators that her foster-mother was suspicious, but that Bright went to great lengths to hide the abuse.

    She also hid the abuse, telling investigators that she lied to caseworkers, to keep things steady at home.

    She did have moments of resistance, telling investigators that at one point she asked if they could stop, but he said he couldn’t, that he, “needed to get as much in before he died.”

    And it’s possible she wasn’t Bright’s only victim. She told police that another of his foster children told her that he was having sex with her as well. On that, police wouldn’t comment.

    http://rochesterhomepage.net/content…ext/?cid=15518

    child death, child sex crimes, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, death penalty, domestic violence, family, General, government, law, legal, rape, sexual assault, system failure, U.S. Supreme Court
    Texas Argues Death Penalty For Child Rapists

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/yahoolatestnews/stories/041708dnnatscotus.6c5b97cf.html?npc
     
    U.S. Supreme Court to hear Texas argue death penalty for child rapists
    08:39 AM CDT on Wednesday, April 16, 2008
    By BRENDAN MCKENNA / The Dallas Morning News
    bmckenna@dallasnews.com
     
    WASHINGTON — Texas says sometimes the sexual assault of a child can be so violent or obscene that the only appropriate punishment is to execute the offender.
     
    And Wednesday, Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz will make that case to the U.S. Supreme Court, arguing that state legislatures have the constitutional right to allow the death penalty for child rapists.
     
    The case before the court, Kennedy vs. Louisiana, concerns a Louisiana law and the case of a Jefferson Parrish, La., man convicted of raping his 8-year-old stepdaughter. But striking down that law could call into question Texas’ 2007 “Jessica’s Law,” which allows the execution of certain repeat child sex offenders.
     
    The Supreme Court ruled 30 years ago that death was an excessive penalty for the aggravated rape of a 16 year-old girl. But Mr. Cruz said that decision implicitly left open the door for capital punishment for the rape of children in referring to that victim as an adult.
    “The damage inflicted on this 8-year-old girl … will remain with her every day of her life,” Mr. Cruz said. “The Constitution does not prohibit elected legislatures from making the determination that the most egregious forms of child rape should permit the jury to impose the most serious sentence.”
     
    But the prospect of capital punishment could lead to fewer abuses being reported because most child sexual abuse is committed by someone known to and even loved by the victims, said Judy Benitez, executive director of Louisiana Federation Against Sexual Assault. The group is leading a coalition of victims groups opposed to applying the death penalty for child rapes, including the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault.
     
    “These are extremely manipulative people,” she said. “They say to the child, ‘If you tell, you’re going to make the police come and take me away, and then how is Mom going to pay the bills.’ They put it very much on the child.”
     
    The groups also argue that if the death penalty can be imposed for child rape, it could make some offenders more likely to kill their victims to prevent them from testifying, she said.
    Aside from the moral arguments, David Bruck, executive director of the Virginia Capital Case Clearinghouse at Washington and Lee Law School, said Mr. Cruz and the lawyers for Louisiana face serious legal hurdles.
     
    “The Supreme Court doesn’t take very many easy cases, but this should be one,” he said. “The rape of a child is not the same as killing a child, that’s basically what the court said [in 1977]. … Horrible as the crime is, it is not equivalent.”
     
    Mr. Bruck said the court could strike down the Louisiana law and leave Texas’ statute intact because it more narrowly restricts cases in which the death penalty could apply. A ruling is expected later this year.
     
    Arguments for and against allowing the execution of those who sexually assault children:
    AGAINST
    Execution is “cruel and unusual punishment” when applied to child rape cases because the Supreme Court already ruled that it is excessive in rape cases when the victim was not also killed.
     
    Executions for child rape mean the penalties for rape and murder are the same so an offender may be more likely to kill a victim.
     
    Executing child rapists may make it more likely for some child sexual abuse to go unreported.
     
    Louisiana’s law, the subject of the case being argued today, is too broad because it could apply to any rape of a child under 12, not just the most egregious.
     
    FOR:

     Execution is not necessarily barred by previous rulings as excessive for all rape cases, merely for the rape of an adult woman.
     
    Violent rape of a child is particularly egregious and shows “a degree of manifest evil, that is qualitatively” different from other rapes.
     
    Society’s moral standards are evolving to recognize the horror and damage caused by child rape and impose stricter punishments on perpetrators.
     
    Louisiana’s aggravated rape law, which also includes rape of the elderly, allows the death penalty only for rape of children under 12.

    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, family, foster care, General, government, system failure
    Forgotten Children

    My apologies for being stagnant as of late.  Life has been happening, and it hasn’t always been easy..

    Anyhow, this article is a few years old but the problems aren’t – they continue today.

    I hail Comptroller Strayhorn for the work she did in “Forgotten Children” and if you have not read the report and update, I urge you to do so.

    Comptroller Strayhorn Laments “Forgotten Children”

    In State’s Foster Care System, Outlines Massive Overhaul

    Replace State Caseworkers with Enforcement Staff, Yank Licenses of Poor Caregivers, Bring Care Standards to Humane Levels

    (Austin)–Texas Comptroller Carole Keeton Strayhorn today called for a massive overhaul of the state’s foster care system in a special report, “Forgotten Children,” which details a widespread crisis in Texas’ foster care system.

    Photos available Outdoor Urinal at Therapeutic Camp (1MB pdf) Children’s Shoes (1MB pdf) Open Fire Pit and Sleeping Quarters (1MB pdf)

    “They are everybody’s children and nobody’s children,” Strayhorn said. “They are the forgotten children in the foster care system. Some of them find homes with caring foster parents, or in treatment centers with experienced and caring providers, and some do not. Some children have been moved among 30, 40, or even more all-too-temporary ‘homes.’ Some have been sexually, physically and emotionally abused while in the system; some have run away and joined the ranks of the missing. A few have even died at the hands of those entrusted with their care.

    “This report gives these children something they need — a voice,” she said. “This investigation turned this One Tough Grandma into One Heartbroken Grandma.”

    “The truth is that some of these children are no better off in the care of the state than they were in the hands of abusive and negligent parents,” Strayhorn said.

    Among the dozens of recommendations are:

    • Eliminate the inefficient dual system of foster care — one that is run by the state — creating a conflict of interest in which the agency regulates itself.
    • Direct and redirect $193.9 million in savings to better care for children by replacing state caseworkers with independent oversight enforcement staff.
    • Move, immediately, children out of all therapeutic camps that do not meet licensing standards for Permanent Therapeutic Camps.
    • Raise standards across the board to humane levels.
    • Revoke the licenses of facilities that have ongoing problems affecting the health, safety and well being of children.
    • Educate foster care children about free higher education tuition eligibility.
    • Develop a Foster Grandma and Foster Grandpa program to mentor and support the children.

    “I am appalled at the conditions too many of our foster children must endure,” Strayhorn said. “I challenge any defender of the current system’s status quo to put their child or their grandchild in some of the places I’ve seen for one day, much less for a lifetime.”

     

    Responsibility for the broken foster care system rests with state government and the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services (DPRS), now called the Department of Family and Protective Services.

    In fiscal 2003 alone, 26,133 children were in foster care. The state pays from $20 per day per child all the way up to $277 per day for a child with complex needs.

    “The agency tolerates vast disparities in the quality of the services it purchases,” Strayhorn said. “It uses taxpayer dollars inefficiently and fails to take advantage of federal funding. It offers caregivers a perverse financial incentive to keep children in expensive, restrictive placements.

    “I saw children on alarming amounts of psychotropic medications and children who have not seen their caseworker in months,” she said.

    “We must end the current system that has the fox guarding the hen house,” Strayhorn said. “We cannot tolerate a system where regulators regulate themselves.”

    Problems in DPRS include inefficient use of taxpayer dollars, inadequate licensing and contracting standards, ineffective investigations, heavy caseloads and high employee turnover, which prevent the agency from closely watching over the children in their care.

    “I saw filthy living conditions, make-shift outhouses, unsanitary food storage, in so-called outdoor camps where children must sleep in sleeping bags – no walls, no fans, no heat – for months and months, and in many cases, year after year. That’s not care. That’s cruelty. That’s not educating. That’s endangering,” Strayhorn said.

    Strayhorn’s report uncovers the harsh realities of the current foster care system and makes key recommendations aimed at improving the entire system. She recommends that the state raise the bar on quality, make the foster care system more accountable, ensure the health and safety of all foster care children, and provide a brighter future for foster children.

    Strayhorn said she did find facilities that did treat children well.

    “In each and every instance where children were getting the best care, the care givers are working closely and openly with the community,” Strayhorn said. “Each facility needs that close relationship, operating in the sunshine, and support from the communities they serve. Without that relationship, the children suffer.”

    “It has been said that any society can be judged by how it treats its weakest members. My investigation shows that Texas can and must be judged harshly,” Strayhorn said. “Foster care in this state has been studied time and time again; reports are issued, promises are made, and the children continue to suffer. That’s unacceptable.”

    Strayhorn said she planned to monitor changes made, or not made, as a result of this special report and “for the sake of our forgotten children, I will report back to the people of Texas, in six weeks and six months and as long as it takes to fix this broken system and save all of our children.”


    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, General, government, healing, missing child, system failure
    Register Your Case Against the Department of Social and Health Services
    A lawsuit has been filed and is seeking class action status against the department alleging violations of constitutional rights. Nine Latina child care workers claim the state came into their homes and seized personal records in search of ‘phantom children’. The lawsuit also alleges discrimination against child care workers on the basis of ethnicity and language.

    Register your Department of Social and Health Services Case

    If you feel you qualify for damages or remedies that might be awarded in a possible class action or lawsuit, please click the link below to submit your complaint. By submitting this form, you are asking lawyers to contact you. You are under no obligation to accept their services. Lawyers are usually paid out of the proceeds of the settlement or verdict rendered.

    Please click here for a free evaluation of your case
    Columbia Legal Services – Joe Morrison
    (Source: LawyersandSettlements.com)

    “Its ALmost Tuesday” and its blogowner  is merely providing you with a link to register your Department of Social and Health Services case; we make no promises, form no opinions as to how your case may be evaluated; and we are not lawyers nor giving legal advice.
    General, writing
    If you haven’t read it – Go Read It – This Poetry Moves…

     (see the sidebar for an RSS Feed)

    The Day He Came

    Running
    Jumping
    Playing
    Safe

    Giggles
    Laughter
    Fun
    Loved

    He came

    Screaming
    Shouting
    Swearing
    Fear

    Tears
    Cruelty
    Pain
    Hate

    Desperation

    No escape

    Desperation.

    The day he came

    Childhood
    Freedom
    Joy
    Life

    Taken away

    Where did our childhood go
    Has it been kept safe somewhere unknown?
    And one day together
    We can finish those wonderful years
    Where we had been given so much love

    Secure
    Care free

    Allowed to be
    Children

    Until
    The day he came

    Christopher Wellbelove
    30 September 2007

    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, family, foster care, General, government, love, missing child, social services, system failure
    In Memory: These children died In the government’s care in the name of “safety”

     

    These children were killed or died AFTER they were taken into CPS’s custody for allegations of abuse/neglect against their caretakers at their natural home

    .

    In Memory

    There are two parts of this list that get me the most in a shuddering chills kind of way –

    • First, is how many times i roll the scroll ball in the middle of my mouse to scroll through the whole list… it keeps going and going and going;  

    • Second, I can’t imagine how bad it has to have been for a child who is removed from their home and placed in a foster home to commit suicide at age 12; how many 12 year olds commit suicide?

    One is too many.

    1.. Genesis Acosta-Garcia, Las Vegas Nevada, three months old, November 19, 2005, septic shock

    2.. Travis C Adams, Salem Oregon, August 8 2000, December 16 2002, wandered into creek

    3.. Kayla Y Allen, Richlands North Carolina, November 10 1995 – August 24 2003, poison

    4.. Martin Lee Anderson, Panama City Florida, fourteen years old, January 6 2006, beating/sickle cell

    5.. Richard L (Ricky) Aragon, Albuquerque New Mexico, January 24 1991 – April 12 1993, battered

    6.. Shirley Arciszewski, Charlotte North Carolina, April 19 1992 – September 11 2004, restraint

    7.. Miguel Humberto Arias-Baca, Westminster Colorado, two years old, February 2 1999, battered

    8.. Ian August, Sevier Desert Utah, June 21 1988 – July 13, 2002, exhaustion

    9.. Denzel Bailey, Los Angeles California, eleven months old, April 2001, malnutrition

    10.. Jeffrey Baldwin, Toronto Ontario, December 20 1996 – November 30 2002, malnutrition/pneumonia

    11.. Casey Paul Barrow, West Valley Utah, eighteen months old, October 22, 2003, battered

    12.. Anthony Bars, Indiana, four years old, January 20 2004, starvation, battered

    13.. Shelly Bash, Midland Michigan, eight years old, March 2005, transplant rejection

    14.. Nadine Catherine Beaulieu, Dauphin Manitoba, twenty three months old, February 1996, battered

    15.. Teddy Bellingham, Smiths Falls Ontario, sixteen years old, August 1992, beaten

    16.. Jerome Bennett, Oshawa Ontario, fifteen years old, February 3 2006, homicide

    17.. Maria Bennett, Lancaster Ohio, two years old, October 23, 2002, battered

    18.. Modesto Blanco, Lubbock Texas, twenty two months old, March 2 2002,battered

    19.. Christian Blewitt né sik, Halesowen England, three years old, December 2002, poison/battered

    20.. Deondre Bondieumaitre, Florida, sixteen months old, April 16 2003,battered

    21.. Timothy Boss, Remsen Iowa, ten years old, February 23 2000, battered

    22.. Alex Boucher, New Port Richey Florida, January 25 1997 – September 25 2000, asphyxiation

    23.. Ashley Boyd, LaFayette Georgia, twelve years old, December 13 2005, hit by car / suicide

    24.. Kerry Brooks, Los Angeles California, nine years old, February 10 2001, suicide

    25.. Talitha Brooks, Colorado, one year old, July 1998, heatstroke

    26.. Amira Brown, Reading Pennsylvania, twelve years old, September 4 2005, battered / restraint

    27.. Diminiqua Bryant, Dothan Alabama, two years old, May 1999, battered

    28.. Scott Buckle, Swansea Wales, twelve years old, February 6 2005, hanging

    29.. Latasha Bush, Manvel Texas, January 2 1987 – February 28 2002, restraint

    30.. Michael Buxton, Miami Oklahoma, five years old, July 5 1998, battered

    31.. Eduardo Calzada, Bakersfield California, three months old, March 2004, battered

    32.. Chris Campbell, Toledo Iowa, thirteen years old, November 2, 1997, restraint

    33.. Gladys Campbell, Philadelphia/New Jersey, two years old, ca 1988

    34.. Edith Campos, Tucson Arizona, fifteen years old, February 4 1998, restraint

    35.. Latasha Cannon, Boston Massachusetts, seventeen years old, April 2001, slashed throat

    36.. Mario Cano, Chula Vista California, sixteen years old, April 27 1984, untreated blood clot

    37.. Joshua K Causey, Detroit Michigan, March 21 1998 – March 18 2003, battered

    38.. Sherry Charlie, British Columbia, nineteen months old, September 4 2002, battered

    39.. Sarah Angelina Chavez, Alhambra California, two years old, October 11 2005, battered

    40.. Felix Chen, Bloomington Indiana, August 27 1997 – April 1 2004, treatment withheld

    41.. Sky Colon Cherevez, Paterson New Jersey, three months old, August 6, 1998, battered

    42.. Tiffany H Clair, Fort Worth Texas, September 6 1985 – May 4 2001, heroin

    43.. Brian Clark, New Jersey, three years old, January 2002, untreated pneumonia

    44.. Angelic Clary, Bakersfield California, three months old September 14 2003

    45.. Roshelle Clayborn, San Antonio Texas, sixteen years old, August 18 1997, restraint

    46.. Casey Collier, Westminster Colorado, seventeen years old, December 21 1993, restraint

    47.. Desiree Collins, Los Angeles California, fourteen years old, February 10 2002, gunshot

    48.. Nicholas Contreras, Queen Creek Arizona, January 15 1982 – March 2 1998, untreated infection

    49.. Adrianna Cram, Veracruz Mexico (US supervision), August 25 2000 – June 13 2005

    50.. Christopher Henry Cryderman, Springfield Missouri, July 27 2004 – November 22 2004, untreated infection

    51.. Dirk D Dalton, Clarkston Washington, June 7 1989 – May 1 1994, battered

    52.. Arieale Daniels, Naples Florida, fifteen years old, 1999, car crash

    53.. Tajuana Davidson, Phoenix Arizona, three years old, November 3 1993, battered

    54.. China Marie Davis, Phoenix Arizona, March 23 1991 – October 31 1993, battered

    55.. Sabrina Elizabeth Day, Charlotte North Carolina, July 4 1984 – February 10 2000, restraint

    56.. Tyler Jospeh DeLeon, Stevens County Washington, January 13 1998 – January 13 2005, dehydration

    57.. Kameron Justin Demery, Long Beach California, two years old, October 14 1996, battered

    58.. Connre Dixon, Ridgefield Township Onio eleven years old, October 18, 2004, stabbing

    59.. Mark Draheim, Orefield Pennsylvania, October 10 1984 – December 11 1998, restraint

    60.. Charmaria Drake, Cleveland Ohio, twenty months old, March 13 2003, battered

    61.. Stephanie Duffield, Manvel Texas, July 14 1984 – February 11 2001, restraint

    62.. Willie Lawrence Durden III, Citrus County Florida, seventeen years old, October 2005, unknown/died in cell

    63.. Brian Edgar, Overland Park Kansas, nine years old, December 30 2002, asphyxiation

    64.. William Edgar, Peterborough Ontario, thirteen years old, March 1999, restraint

    65.. Tiffany Eilders, Rancho Cucamonga California, fourteen weeks old, December 7 2005, battered

    66.. Kayla Erlandson, King County Washington, two years old, April 1991, battered

    67.. Luke Evans, Lowell Indiana, sixteen months old, November 30 2001, malnutrition/battered

    68.. Roberta (Berta) Evers, Bayfield Colorado, six years old, June 13 1998, restraint

    69.. Sara Eyerman, California, twenty months old, ca 1986, untreated pneumonia

    70.. Miranda Finn, Lake Butler Florida, nine years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    71.. Laura Fleming, Palmdale California, October 11 2004 – November 21 2004, cause unknown

    72.. Sarah Jane Forrester, Woodlawn Maryland, October 30 1985 – found May 13 1999, battered and stabbed

    73.. Kameryn Fountain, Bibb County Georgia, two months old, November 20 2005, unknown cause

    74.. Henry Gallop, Boston Massachusetts, two years old, 1987, poison

    75.. Alexander Ganadonegro, Albuquerque New Mexico, March 10 1998, February 4 1999, battered

    76.. Christening (Mikie) Garcia, Ingram Texas, twelve years old, December 4 2005, restraint

    77.. Dylan George, Fremont California, April 16 2002 – October 4 2004, battered

    78.. Corese Goldman, Chicago Illinois, two years old, 1995, drowning

    79.. Mollie Gonzales, Jefferson County Colorado, ten years old, November 18 2002, drug overdose

    80.. Julio Gonzalez, Glendale California, May 10 1995 – December 29 1996, battered

    81.. Elizabeth (Lizzy) Goodwin, Coeur d’Alene Idaho, March 22 1996 – October 22 2002, drowning

    82.. Anthony Green, Brownwood Texas, fifteen years old, May 12 1991, restraint

    83.. Sabrina Green, New York City, nine years old, November 8 1997, burned and battered

    84.. Lamar D Greene, Jacksonville Florida, sixteen years old, 2001, car crash

    85.. Corey Greer, Treasure Island Florida, four months old, ca 1985, dehydration

    86.. Gage Guillen, Boston Massachusetts, three years old, 1995, strangulation

    87.. Darvell Gulley, Lincoln Nebraska, thirteen years old, April 27 2002, restraint

    88.. Savannah Brianna Marie Hall, Prince George British Columbia, September 9 1997 – January 21 2001, malnutrition/restraint

    89.. Latiana Hamilton, Jacksonville Florida, seventeen months old,July 18 2001, drowning

    90.. Mykeeda Hampton, District of Columbia, two years old, August 1997, battered

    91.. Kelly M Hancock, Malden Massachusetts, November 6 1985 – July 18 2000, stabbed

    92.. Laura Hanson, West Palm Beach Florida, May 17 1981 – November 19 1998, restraint

    93.. Jerrell Hardiman, La Porte Indiana, four years old, October ca 1993, exposure

    94.. Diane Harris, Seguin Texas, seventeen years old, April 11 1990, restraint

    95.. Jessica Albina Hagmann, Prince William County Virginia, two years old, August 11 2003, smothered

    96.. Letia Harrison, Akron Ohio, October 23 1999 – September 19 2002, baked in attic

    97.. Jordan Heikamp, Toronto Ontario, May 19 1997 – June 23 1997, starvation

    98.. Eric Hernandez, Cedar Hill Texas, January 6 1999 – March 7 1999, suffocation

    99.. Zachary Higier, Massachusetts, May 24 2000 – August 15 2002, battered

    100.. Dwight Hill, Tucson Arizona, four months old, November 16 2005, cause unknown

    101.. Nina Victoria Hilt né¥ Vika Bazhenova, Manassas Virginia, thirty three months old, July 2 2005, battered

    102.. Steven A Hoffa, Des Moines Iowa, February 4 1993 – May 18 1996, battered

    103.. Richard (Ricky) Holland, Williamston Michigan, September 8 1997 – July 2005, battered

    104.. Michael Anthony Hughes, Choctaw Oklahoma, March 21 1988 – September 12 1994, kidnap/missing

    105.. Joseph (Joey) Huot, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, two years old, January 27 1988, battered

    106.. Dion Jack, Sproat Lake British Columbia, six years old, March 1 2006, untreated seizure

    107.. Walter Jackson, Chicago Illinois, ten months old, August 9 2005, battered

    108.. Dominic James, Springfield Missouri, June 4 2000 – August 21 2002, battered

    109.. Billie-Jo Jenkins, Hastings East Sussex England, thirteen years old, February 1997, battered

    110.. Demetrius Jeffries, Crockett Texas, seventeen years old, August 26 1997, strangulation

    111.. Dontel Jeffers, Boston Massachusetts, four years old, March 6 2005, battered

    112.. Stephanie Jobin, Brampton Ontario, thirteen years old, June 21 1998, restraint

    113.. Aaron Johnson, Boston Massachusetts, fifteen months old, 1987, poison

    114.. Xolani Nkosi Johnson, Cape town South Africa, twelve years old, June 2 2001, AIDS

    115.. Elijah James Johnson, Los Angeles California, three years old,May 10 1999, scalded

    116.. Lorenzo Johnson, Queen Creek Arizona, 17 years old – June 27, 1994, drowned during escape

    117.. Quartrina K (Snappy) Johnson, Pikesville Maryland, December 25 1988-July 20 2004, beaten and choked

    118.. Christal Jones, New York City (Vermont ward), May 24 1984 – January 3 2001, suffocation

    119.. David L Jones, Chicago Illinois, April 15 1992 – March 7 1998, battered

    120.. Dennis Jurgens né Serry Sherwood, White Bear Lake Minnesota, three years old, April 11 1965, battered

    121.. Marissa (Shorty) Karp, Pompano Beach Florida, December 6 1985 – August 19 2002, gunshot

    122.. David Ryan Keeley, New Haven Connecticut, six years old, August 12 1998, battered

    123.. Ashley Keen, Lake Butler Florida, thirteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    124.. Cassandra Killpack, Springville Utah, November 29 1997 – June 9 2002, water therapy

    125.. Ahmad King né ‘awls, Alma Georgia, three years old, January 24 2006, homicide

    126.. Heather Michell Kish, Berlin Township Michigan, September 15 1987 – found October 6 2002, murdered

    127.. Noah Knapp, Marysville Washington, six years old, May 30 2005, automobile collision

    128.. Zaire Knott, Newark New Jersey, September 16 2005 – October 20 2005, cause unknown

    129.. Anatoli Kolenda, Westfield Massachusetts, May 20 1991 – October 20 2002, stabbing

    130.. Yana Kolenda, Westfield Massachusetts, December 31 1990 – October 20 2002, stabbing

    131.. Anthony Lamb, Lake Butler Florida, twenty months old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    132.. Keisha Shardae Lane, Hagerstown Maryland, fifteen years old, August 17 2005, gunshot

    133.. Shawn Lawrence né ndy Mohler, Shelton Washington, ten years old, October 9 1999, drowning

    134.. Brittany Legler, Millcreek Pennsylvania, fifteen years old, May 9 2004, battered

    135.. Jacob Lindorff, Franklin Township New Jersey, five years old December 14 2001, battered

    136.. Christian Liz, New York City, three weeks old, November 29 2004, suffocation

    137.. James Lonnee, Guelph/Hamilton Ontario, sixteen years old, September 7 1996, beaten by cellmate

    138.. Gregory Love, Florida, twenty three months old, April 2005, head injury

    139.. Nikki Lutke, Cheyenne Wyoming, five years old, August 28 2003, drowning

    140.. Zachary James Lyons, Winston-Salem North Carolina, January 24 1992 – October 8 1996, battered

    141.. Shaquella Mance, Belton South Carolina, seven months old, March 27 2005, battered

    142.. Elizabeth Mann, Lake Butler Florida, fifteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    143.. Heaven Mann, Lake Butler Florida, three years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    144.. Johnny Mann, Lake Butler Florida, thirteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    145.. Cynthia Nicole (Nicki) Mann, Lake Butler Florida, fifteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

    146.. Logan Marr, Chelsea Maine, October 14 1995 – January 31 2001, asphyxiation

    147.. Stephanie Martinez, Pueblo Colorado, five years old, December 31 2001, untreated burns

    148.. Tiffany Laverne Mason, Folsom California, June 11 1986 – August 9 2001, battered

    149.. Viktor Alexander Matthey né – Sergeyevich Tulimov, Hunterdon County New Jersey, six years old, October 31 2000, hypothermia

    150.. Dominic Matz, Osawatomie Kansas, July 6 2002 – February 15 2004, treatment withheld

    151.. Jamie Mayne, Atascadero California, March 24 1995 – February 10 2000, battered

    152.. Kristal Mayon-Ceniceros, Chula Vista California, sixteen years old, February 5 1999, restraint

    153.. Emily Ann Mays, Tucson Arizona, sixteen months old, August 24 2005, battered

    154.. Andrew McClain, Bridgeport Connecticut, December 6 1986 – March 22 1998, restraint

    155.. Cory Bradley McLaughlin, North Carolina, four years old, July 4 1997, battered

    156.. Jerry McLaurin, Brownwood Texas, fourteen years old, November 2 1999, restraint

    157.. Maria Mendoza, Katy Texas, fourteen years old, October 12 2002,restraint

    158.. Caleb Jerome Merchant, Edmonton Alberta, thirteen months old, November 26, 2005, battered

    159.. Denis Merryman né .ritsky, Harford County Maryland, eight years old, January 2005, starvation

    160.. Jacob Miller, Georgia, twenty two months old, November 20 1997, battered

    161.. Clayton Miracle, Georgia, three years old, August 11 1993, battered

    162.. Hanna Denise Montessori, Santa Ana California, March 16 1988 – January 19 2004, homicide/head-injury

    163.. Alfredo Montez, Auburndale Florida, two years old, July 1 2002, battered

    164.. Zachary Moran, Charlotte North Carolina, fourteen months old, August 8 2003, battered

    165.. Christina Morlan, Scott County Iowa, September 3 2003 – November 30 2003, unknown

    166.. Carlyle Mullins, Nashville Tennessee, five years old, May 27 2005, battered

    167.. Cedrick Napoleon, Killeen Texas, June 26 1987 – March 7 2002, restraint

    168.. Candace Newmaker né¥ C Tiara Elmore, Colorado, November 19 1989 – April 19 2000, re-birth asphyxiation

    169.. Jonathan Nichol, Cook County Illinois, two years old, June 16 1995, drowning

    170.. Trevor Nolan, Mono County California, five years old, April 12 1997, treatment withheld

    171.. Sierra Odom, Arlington Texas, three years old, August 11 2005, battered

    172.. Keron Owens, Walterboro South Carolina, three years old, January 19 1992, battered

    173.. Sean Paddock né ?ord, Johnston County North Carolina, four years old, February 26 2006, battered

    174.. Omar Paisley, Miami Florida, seventeen years old, June 2003, untreated appendicitis

    175.. Terrell Parker, Buffalo New York, two years old, 2003, battered

    176.. Travis Parker, Cleveland Georgia, thirteen years old, April 21 2005, restraint

    177.. Alex Pavlis, Schaumburg Illinois, six years old, December 19 2003, battered

    178.. Dawn Renay Perry, Manvel Texas, sixteen years old, April 10 1993, restraint

    179.. Angellica Pesante, Seneca County New York, four years old, April 18 1997, battered

    180.. Terrell Peterson, Atlanta Georgia, five years old, January 16 1998, battered

    181.. Cynteria Phillips, Miami Florida, December 10 1986 – August 14 2000, rape/murder

    182.. Marguerite Pierre, West Orange New Jersey, five years old, December 2005, poison

    183.. Emporia Pirtle, Indiana, six years old, November 11 1996, battered

    184.. Jason Plischkowsky, Southampton England, May 25 1985 – December 19 1986, head injury

    185.. Huntly Tamati Pokaia, New Zealand, three years old

    186.. David Polreis, Greeley Colorado, two years old, February 6 1996, battered

    187.. Maryah Ponce, Rialto California, December 5 1997 – June 29 2001, baked in car

    188.. Constance S Porter, Kearney Missouri, July 20 1998 – February 12 2001, battered

    189.. Dakota Denzel Prince-Smith, Lancaster California, five years old, July 8 2003, baked in car

    190.. Nehamiah Nate Prince-Smith, Lancaster California, three years old, July 8 2003, baked in car

    191.. Karen Quill, St Louis Saskatchewan, twenty months old,September 13 1997, internal injuries

    192.. Rodrigo Armando Rameriez Jr, Victorville California, eighteen months old, July 6 2001, drowning

    193.. Stephanie Ramos, New York City, eight years old, July 9 2005,dumped in garbage can

    194.. Bobby Jo Randolph, Houston Texas, seventeen years old, September 26 1996, asphyxiation

    195.. Jacquelyn Reah, Grand Rapids Michigan, ten years old, November 27 2004, runaway / hit by car

    196.. Latayna Reese, Bradenton Florida, fifteen years old, April 1996

    197.. Caprice Reid, New York City, four years old, June 1997, starved and battered

    198.. Jonathan Reid, Gardena California, nine years old, June 9 1997treatment withheld

    199.. Matthew Reid, Welland Ontario, three years old, December 15 2005, suffocation

    200.. Dustin Rhodes, Litchfield Park Arizona, nine years old, August 13 2003, battered

    201.. Eric Roberts, Keene Texas, June 16 1979 – February 22 1996, restraint

    202.. Ana Rogers, Sparks Nevada, four months old, July 2005, pre-existing injury

    203.. Genevieve “Genny” Rojas, Chula Vista California, four years old, July 21 1995, starvation, scalded

    204.. Paola Rosales, Milton Ontario, fourteen years old, July 3 2001, suicide

    205.. Kyle Anthony Ross, Massachusetts, September 7 1995 – June 9 2001, rottweiler

    206.. Marlon Santos, Worcester Massachusetts, five months old, November 5 1998, missing

    207.. Andres E Saragos, Warm Springs Oregon, August 5 1995 – July 13 2000, baked in car

    208.. Gina M Score, Plankinton South Dakota, May 7 1985 – July 21 1999, baked by boot camp

    209.. Caprice Scott, Florida, infant, 1999, mother in foster care

    210.. Ryan Scott, Sheffield Lake Ohio, two years old, March 27 1998, battered

    211.. Krystal Scurry, Aiken County South Carolina, February 1989 – November 2 1991, rape/murder

    212.. Andrew (Andy) Setzer, California, April 27 1995 – August 2 1999, battered

    213.. Ariel Shaw, Bibb County Georgia, nineteen months old, January 26 2000, battered

    214.. Vivan Uk Sheppard, Jacksonville Florida, eight months old, May 15 1999, suffocation

    215.. Joseph H Shriver, Pennsylvania, March 2 1997 – October 5 1997, battered

    216.. Quincey L Simmons, Omaha Nebraska, August 21 1997 – March 24 2001, battered

    217.. Christopher Simpson, Michigan, seven years old, November 14 1998, fire

    218.. Jordan Simpson Howell Morrison II, Howell Michigan, five years old, November 14 1998, fire

    219.. Nicole Simpson , Michigan, seven years old, November 14 1998, fire

    220.. Devin A Slade, Milwaukee Wisconsin, October 23 2000 – June 19 2001, asphyxiation

    221.. John Smith, Fishersgate England, four years old, December 24 1999, battered and bitten

    222.. Mikinah Smith, Cincinnati Ohio, one year old, March 18 2003, battered

    223.. Tristan Sovern, Greensboro North Carolina, sixteen years old, March 4 1998, restraint

    224.. Jushai Spurgeon, North Las Vegas Nevada, fourteen months old, April 3 2005, scalding

    225.. LeRon St John, Detroit Michigan, fifteen years old, March 1 2003, untreated tuberculosis

    226.. Lloyd Stamp, Edmonton Alberta, seventeen years old, September 29, 2005, suicide

    227.. Tommy Stacey, Carmichael California, three months old, January 3 2005, SIDS

    228.. Elizabeth (Lisa) Steinberg né¥ Launders, New York City, May 14 1981 – November 4 1987, battered

    229.. Yasmin Taylor, Paterson New Jersey, seven months old, May 8 1994, virus

    230.. Lakeysha Tharp, Irmo South Carolina, six months old, April 7 2004, asphyxiation

    231.. Adam Michael Thimyan, Riverview Florida, October 2 1986 – April 3 2004, gunshot

    232.. Timithy Thomas, Banner Elk North Carolina, nine years old, March 11 1999, restraint

    233.. Liam Thompson né “mitry S Ishlankulov, Columbus Ohio, October 3 1999 – October 3 2002, scalding

    234.. Michael Tinning, Schenectady New York, two years old, March 2 1981, asphyxiation

    235.. Kelly Ann Tozer, Egg Harbor City New Jersey, eighteen months old, July 30 2005, drowning

    236.. Patrick Trauffler, Phoenix Arizona, six weeks old, February 18 2003, battered

    237.. Demetrius Tyler, Johnson City Tennessee, six months old, November 10 2004, drowning

    238.. Tyler Vanpopering, Southgate Michigan, September 23 2003 – April 14 2004, battered

    239.. Jacqueline Venay, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, six years old, September 21 1998, battered

    240.. George Walker III, DeKalb County Georgia, ten months old, November 7, 2002, choking

    241.. Michelle Walton, Boston Massachusetts, October 6 1994, asphyxiation

    242.. Erickyzha Warner, Utica New York, July 19 2002 – May 31, 2004, untreated burns

    243.. Shane Devell Washington, Fresno California, fifteen months old, circa 1996, drowning

    244.. Evan Watkins, Las Vegas Nevada, twenty one months old, July 11 1996, battered

    245.. Devin Wilder, Cleveland Ohio, July 29 1998 – April 21 2001, battered

    246.. Dominic J Williams, Saint Louis Missouri, June 8 1987 – June 3 2004,strangulation

    247.. Andrew Wilson, Owensboro Kentucky, three years old, August 7 2005, drowning

    248.. Lorenzo J Wilson, Seattle Washington, January 29 2004 – October 22 2004, battered

    249.. Rilya Wilson, Florida, born September 29 1996, disappeared 2001

    250.. Michael Spencer Wiltsie, Silver Springs Florida, September 18 1987 – February 5, 2000, restraint

    251.. Jimmy Allan Wood, Adams County Colorado, fourteen years old, November 13 2002, drug overdose

    252.. Jonnie Wood, Springdale Arkansas, eight years old, August 13 2005, drowning

    253.. Braxton D Wooden, Missouri, May 15 1997 – June 2 2005, gunshot

    254.. Donte L Woods, West Palm Beach Florida, February 25 1986 – May 27 2002, gunshot

    255.. Thomas (T J) Wright, Providence Rhode Island, three years old, October 31 2004, battered

    256.. Willie Wright, San Antonio Texas, fourteen years old, March 4 2000, restraint

    257.. Rufus Manzie Young Jr, Michigan, four years old, April 6 2003, battered

    cps, funding, General, social workers
    UW School of Social Work will pay students’ tuition

    I’m not sure how I feel about this.  I think its a good thing, promotes educating social workers which we all know is important.  However other career students have to pay for their schooling, why shouldn’t they? Then again there is a shortage in good social workers, its hard to find people for that position, its a toughie.  Any comments? I’d love to hear from you.

    by Liz Frantz
    Monday, October 1, 2007

    The recently developed Public Child Welfare Training Program in the University of Wisconsin School of Social Work will pay students’ tuition in exchange for a promise that, upon graduation, the students will work in Wisconsin’s public child welfare system for at least one year.

    The program would cover the cost of a Master’s degree for social work students.

    UW’s School of Social Work is consistently ranked among the best schools in the country.

    “Jobs graduates usually take after graduation are in children’s protective services, special needs adoption and foster care,” Susan Michaud, a social work lecturer and CWTP coordinator said. “But there are never enough people willing to work in children’s protective services, so we continue to educate and train people to enter that line of work in the CWTP program.”

    The program aims to combat inadequate professional preparation by requiring all trainees to complete a specialized curriculum aimed at preparation for employment. This program is intended to help students develop into superior child welfare specialists.

    “Training and education includes rigorous coursework, as well as field placement in public child welfare agencies, such as the Rock and Dane County Human Services,” Michaud said.

    The child welfare training program admits between 12 and 15 students each year and accepts up to 120 students overall, according to the School of Social Work’s website.

    Using federal funds distributed by the state Department of Health and Family Services, the seven-year-old program is making strides toward filling more and more open social work positions in Wisconsin, Michaud said.

    Michaud believes that if students get a high-quality education in public child welfare, they are more likely to continue on into a career in child welfare services as well.

    National studies show child welfare workers are most likely to leave the field within the first two years, often because they are insufficiently prepared for what they will experience on the job, according to a UW press release.

    Jill Kvigney, a UW alumnus and CWTP participant, said her field studies in child abuse investigation left her very well prepared for a future career in child welfare.

    “It gave me an opportunity to learn a lot about child welfare work in a non-threatening work environment,” Kvigney said. “I was able to not worry about my paycheck or my boss, and just take in the information every day.”

    Kvigney added the program was an incredible learning experience, which was made more effective by the time she spent in child welfare agencies.

    Candace Harrison, a UW alumnus and former CWTP member, added the overall goal of the program is to prepare trainees in the child welfare field for their future careers.

    “In my experience, I can say that the classes I took in the program provided me with a profound knowledge base for my future career,” Harrison said.

    Michaud said the most satisfying thing about being involved in the UW School of Social Work’s CWTP program is keeping track of graduated students’ careers in child welfare.

    “It’s very gratifying to see the vast majority of former participants stay in public welfare, and to see them happy and fulfilled in their professions,” Michaud said.