Tag: education

adoption, awareness, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, family, foster care, government, system failure, videos
Videos:Foster care from the child’s point of view

PART 1

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu4nldTcpt8&feature=related]

 

 

PART 2

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zbrk_Rd8xEU&feature=related]

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART 3

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNIlXOALJjo&feature=related]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART 4

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8C9W5JewDI&feature=related]

child death, child sex crimes, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, death penalty, domestic violence, family, General, government, law, legal, rape, sexual assault, system failure, U.S. Supreme Court
Texas Argues Death Penalty For Child Rapists

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/yahoolatestnews/stories/041708dnnatscotus.6c5b97cf.html?npc
 
U.S. Supreme Court to hear Texas argue death penalty for child rapists
08:39 AM CDT on Wednesday, April 16, 2008
By BRENDAN MCKENNA / The Dallas Morning News
bmckenna@dallasnews.com
 
WASHINGTON — Texas says sometimes the sexual assault of a child can be so violent or obscene that the only appropriate punishment is to execute the offender.
 
And Wednesday, Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz will make that case to the U.S. Supreme Court, arguing that state legislatures have the constitutional right to allow the death penalty for child rapists.
 
The case before the court, Kennedy vs. Louisiana, concerns a Louisiana law and the case of a Jefferson Parrish, La., man convicted of raping his 8-year-old stepdaughter. But striking down that law could call into question Texas’ 2007 “Jessica’s Law,” which allows the execution of certain repeat child sex offenders.
 
The Supreme Court ruled 30 years ago that death was an excessive penalty for the aggravated rape of a 16 year-old girl. But Mr. Cruz said that decision implicitly left open the door for capital punishment for the rape of children in referring to that victim as an adult.
“The damage inflicted on this 8-year-old girl … will remain with her every day of her life,” Mr. Cruz said. “The Constitution does not prohibit elected legislatures from making the determination that the most egregious forms of child rape should permit the jury to impose the most serious sentence.”
 
But the prospect of capital punishment could lead to fewer abuses being reported because most child sexual abuse is committed by someone known to and even loved by the victims, said Judy Benitez, executive director of Louisiana Federation Against Sexual Assault. The group is leading a coalition of victims groups opposed to applying the death penalty for child rapes, including the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault.
 
“These are extremely manipulative people,” she said. “They say to the child, ‘If you tell, you’re going to make the police come and take me away, and then how is Mom going to pay the bills.’ They put it very much on the child.”
 
The groups also argue that if the death penalty can be imposed for child rape, it could make some offenders more likely to kill their victims to prevent them from testifying, she said.
Aside from the moral arguments, David Bruck, executive director of the Virginia Capital Case Clearinghouse at Washington and Lee Law School, said Mr. Cruz and the lawyers for Louisiana face serious legal hurdles.
 
“The Supreme Court doesn’t take very many easy cases, but this should be one,” he said. “The rape of a child is not the same as killing a child, that’s basically what the court said [in 1977]. … Horrible as the crime is, it is not equivalent.”
 
Mr. Bruck said the court could strike down the Louisiana law and leave Texas’ statute intact because it more narrowly restricts cases in which the death penalty could apply. A ruling is expected later this year.
 
Arguments for and against allowing the execution of those who sexually assault children:
AGAINST
Execution is “cruel and unusual punishment” when applied to child rape cases because the Supreme Court already ruled that it is excessive in rape cases when the victim was not also killed.
 
Executions for child rape mean the penalties for rape and murder are the same so an offender may be more likely to kill a victim.
 
Executing child rapists may make it more likely for some child sexual abuse to go unreported.
 
Louisiana’s law, the subject of the case being argued today, is too broad because it could apply to any rape of a child under 12, not just the most egregious.
 
FOR:

 Execution is not necessarily barred by previous rulings as excessive for all rape cases, merely for the rape of an adult woman.
 
Violent rape of a child is particularly egregious and shows “a degree of manifest evil, that is qualitatively” different from other rapes.
 
Society’s moral standards are evolving to recognize the horror and damage caused by child rape and impose stricter punishments on perpetrators.
 
Louisiana’s aggravated rape law, which also includes rape of the elderly, allows the death penalty only for rape of children under 12.

child adoption, cps, family, foster care, home
Bonding With Your Foster Child

Top 10 Five Minute Bonding Activities

From Carrie Craft,
Your Guide to Adoption / Foster Care.

These activities are not for every foster/adoptive parent or every foster/adoptive child. Only do what is comfortable for you and your foster/adopted child.
Keep in mind:

  • Child’s Age – Chronological and Emotional
  • Child’s History of Abuse and/or Neglect
  • Comfort Levels

Please note that I’m not promoting these activities as a way to create an instant bond between you and your child. Bonding is a process that takes time. These activities are ideas that will help start the process of bonding.

1. Brushing Hair

This can be a great and easy way to spend time with a child. It also involves a safe touch, which is so important to creating a loving bond.

2. Read a Story

Not only will you be increasing your bond by spending time together, you’ll be increasing the child’s vocabulary and other literary skills.

3. Sing Songs

We used to have a tradition of singing songs before tucking our daughter into bed, favorites included Old Macdonald, London Bridge, and many different Sunday School songs. Also try songs like “This Little Piggy” where each line of the song is sang as you tickle a toe, involves appropriate, safe touching with a child who may be fearful of touch due to past abuse.

4. Clapping Games and Rhymes

Remember the games played on elementary playgrounds? If not here are some web sites with words. Fun activity involving safe touch.

5. Bed Time Routine

A routine can include tucking in with a soft blanket, hugs and kisses, a short story, song, or prayer. Keep in mind the comfort level of all involved. If a history of sexual abuse exists or you don’t know the child’s history, protect yourself against allegations by having another adult with you at bed time.

6. Staring Contest

Maintain direct eye contact, the first person to look away or blink loses. A fun game for older children and a great way to have eye contact which helps build attachment. Be sure the child does not interpret this activity as threatening or intimidating and understands that it is a game.

7. Hand Games

More safe touching activities like Rock Paper Scissors, Bubble Gum Bubble Gum in a Dish, or Thumb Wrestling. Some of the above links will take you to pages filled with more game ideas.

8. Paint Finger and Toe Nails

More appropriate for girls – this is a sweet way to spend five minutes. Consider allowing the child to paint your nails.

9. Rocking

This is one bonding activity in which you must calculate emotional age, history, and comfort levels. My son was 12 when he came to us as a foster child, but he needed and welcomed being held and rocked. I spoke to his therapist before rocking him and had no trouble in doing so. He was extremely small for his age, which made rocking him easier. Be aware of sexual arousal with older children and activities that involve such closeness.

10. Lotioning

Applying lotion to a child’s hands and feet can also be part of a bedtime routine. Children of color will benefit from having lotion applied to their legs, arms, face, and back. Caution: Consider child’s sexual abuse history, age, and comfort level with this activity. Some abused children can misinterpret different kinds of touch. Be aware of sexual arousal. If you sense that any activity is upsetting to the child – stop. Document the incident, tell the therapist at your next meeting.

cps, families, family, foster care, government, law, legal
New Revisions to CPS Handbook 2007 – Texas

This revision of the Child Protective Services Handbook was published on November 1, 2007. Summaries of new revised items are posted below, followed by the edited versions with significant changes noted in red. Not displayed are minor copy editing and formatting changes.

Baby Moses Cases

The items listed below are revised to include:

  ·  the recent change in the law allowing CPS to file for termination of parental rights as a part of the original petition;

  ·  the presumption that the person who delivers the child to the designated emergency infant care provider is the biological parent, and intends to relinquish parental rights; and

  ·  criteria for determining whether or not a child born and left at a hospital constitutes a Baby Moses case.

Changes made for style and clarification are not displayed in revision mode. See:

2360 Baby Moses Cases

2361 Criteria for a Baby Moses Case

2361.1 A Harmed Infant

2361.2 A Designated Emergency Infant Care (DEIC) Provider

2362.3 When Someone Claims to Be a Parent or Relative of the Infant

Correction

Item 7244 is deleted to correct an oversight made during a revision in September 2006, when the information in Item 7244 was incorporated into 7460 Intermittent Alternate Care, Baby-Sitting, Overnight Care, and Respite Care.

2360 Baby Moses Cases

CPS October 2006 November 2007

A Baby Moses case is a specific type of abandonment case in which an infant has been delivered to a designated emergency infant care (DEIC) provider and other statutory criteria are met. The purpose of this law is to encourage parents who might otherwise abandon a newborn in a dumpster or other unsafe place to deliver an infant safely to an appropriate facility. To encourage use of DEIC providers and to promote safety, parents who comply with this law are protected from child abandonment allegations or criminal penalties. Some infants that are delivered to a designated emergency infant care (DEIC) provider are a special subset within the abandoned child definition and are often referred to as cases under the Baby Moses law.

Texas Family Code §§262.302; 262.303; 262.308; 262.309; and 263.407

2361 Criteria for a Baby Moses Case

CPS October 2006 November 2007

An abandoned infant meets the criteria for a Baby Moses case if the infant:

  ·  is known to be or appears to be 60 days old or younger;

  ·  has not been harmed. See 2361.1 A Harmed Infant;

  ·  has been voluntarily delivered to a DEIC provider. See 2361.2 A Designated Emergency Infant Care (DEIC) Provider; and

  ·  is delivered to a DEIC provider by a person (presumed to be a parent) who does not express intent to return for the infant.

When Statutory Criteria Are Not Met

If the criteria for a Baby Moses case are not met (that is, the infant is more than 60 days old, was harmed, or was delivered to a location other than a DEIC provider by someone other than a parent) DFPS must handle the case as it would any other abandonment case. A thorough investigation must be completed, including diligent search efforts to locate parents and relatives of the child. See 2224.1 Thorough Investigations.

When a Child Is Abandoned After Birth in a Medical Facility

If a woman is admitted to a medical facility, gives birth, and leaves the medical facility without the baby, the case would be considered a Baby Moses case if:

  ·  the case meets the general criteria listed in this section;

  ·  the mother indicates in some direct manner that she is unwilling to parent the baby; and

  ·  there is no presumed father.

If a woman is admitted to a medical facility, gives birth, and leaves the medical facility without the baby but does not indicate a deliberate intent not to parent, the worker handles the case as an abandonment case regardless of whether or not there is a presumed father.

When Application of Statutory Criteria Is Unclear

If it is unclear whether a case should be handled as Baby Moses case, the worker consults with supervisory staff, and the DFPS regional attorney. In some instances, the court may close the courtroom and maintain confidentiality as in a Baby Moses case, even though DFPS has determined there is not sufficient basis to terminate parental rights under the Baby Moses statute.

2361.1 A Harmed Infant

CPS October 2006 November 2007

If a “harmed infant” is delivered to a designated emergency infant care (DEIC) provider, the situation is not a Baby Moses case.

The definition of a harmed infant includes, but is not limited to, an infant who:

  ·  appears to have been abused;

  ·  appears to have been neglected; or

  ·  has a positive toxicology screen and other factors (such as the condition of the child) indicate that harm resulted from exposure to alcohol, drugs, poisons, or other substances.

Exposure to Risk of Harm

If an infant is abandoned at a DEIC provider in a manner that causes harm to the infant or exposes the infant to a risk of harm, the case does not qualify as a Baby Moses case. For example, if an infant is left in a remote location in or near a DEIC, where no one is likely to find the child or an infant is left where the child is exposed to severe temperatures or similar dangers, the case is not appropriate for handling as a Baby Moses case. 

2361.2 A Designated Emergency Infant Care (DEIC) Provider

CPS October 2006 November 2007

According to the Baby Moses statutes, the following entities are DEIC providers:

  ·  an emergency medical services provider;

  ·  a hospital; and

  ·  a child-placing agency licensed by DFPS that:

  ·  agrees to act as a DEIC provider, and

  ·  has a licensed registered nurse or licensed emergency services provider on staff.

Texas Family Code §262.301

The following entities are not DEIC providers:

  ·  a DFPS office;

  ·  a police station; or

  ·  any other location that is not noted above as a DEIC provider.

If a parent delivers an infant to an entity that is not a DEIC provider, or delivers an infant in a manner that is not safe, the case does not qualify as a Baby Moses case.

If a woman is admitted to a medical facility and gives birth, then leaves the medical facility without the child, the case does not qualify as a Baby Moses case.

2362 Investigating Cases Under the Baby Moses Law

CPS October 2006 November 2007

After making sure that the infant is safe, the investigator must should immediately determine whether this case meets all of the criteria for a Baby Moses case. See 2361 Criteria for a Baby Moses Case.

In addition to performing the standard tasks for an investigation, the caseworker must take the following actions in every potential Baby Moses investigation:

  ·  Determine the facts surrounding the delivery of the infant to the facility: 

  ·  Know the specific location where the infant was found. If the location is outside the DEIC or in an out of the way location, take a photo of the location.

  ·  Obtain any available description of the person who left the baby, and any written or verbal information the person left.

  ·  Assess the health, age, and general well-being of the infant. This information may be necessary to determine whether the case should be handled as a Baby Moses case. 

  ·  Interview any persons at the designated emergency infant care (DEIC) provider who have information regarding the infant and obtain any form for voluntary disclosure of medical facts and history that was offered to and completed by the parent.

  ·  Notify the state office program specialist responsible for Baby Moses cases within 24 hours of initiating a Baby Moses investigation (excluding weekends and holidays).

  ·  Notify local law enforcement during the investigation and before the court renders an order to terminate parental rights that an infant has been abandoned under the Baby Moses law.

      Ask that law enforcement complete local and state law enforcement checks as well as National Crime Information Center (NCIC) checks to ensure that the abandoned infant has not been previously reported as a missing child. An NCIC check can generally be completed by a local law enforcement agency.

      If the local law enforcement agency cannot complete the NCIC check, fax a letter requesting the check to:

Texas Department of Public Safety

Fax: (512) 424-2885

      In the letter, the worker describes the infant, the city in which the infant was abandoned, and the known circumstances surrounding the abandonment. Include the worker’s name, address, phone number, and fax number.

      DPS will conduct an NCIC check to confirm that the infant has not been reported as a missing child.

Texas Family Code §263.407(c)

  ·  Search the paternity registry no earlier than the 30th day after the infant’s estimated date of birth, but as soon as possible after that date. This must be completed before the court enters an order to terminate parental rights. See 5390 Bureau of Vital Statistics Reporting Requirements.

Texas Family Code §263.407(c)

2362.1 Legal Provisions

CPS October 2006 November 2007

There are several differences between a regular CPS investigation and an investigation conducted under the Baby Moses law.

For Baby Moses cases it is presumed that the person who delivers an infant to a designated emergency infant care (DEIC) provider:

  ·  is the infant’s biological parent;

  ·  intends to relinquish parental rights and consents to the termination of parental rights with regard to the infant; and

  ·  intends to waive the right to notice of the suit terminating the parent-child relationship.

Unless a court order requires it, DFPS does not attempt to identify or locate the parent of an infant left under the Baby Moses law, in order to protect the confidentiality of the parent.

Texas Family Code §263.407(a)

Similarly, DFPS does not conduct a search for the relatives of the infant, as this would violate the confidentiality protection provided to the parent.

Texas Family Code §262.309

When DFPS files a petition for a Baby Moses case, DFPS requests a closed hearing. Unless the court finds that the interests of the child or the public would be better served by opening the hearing to the public, the court orders the hearing to be closed. .

Texas Family Code §262.308(c)

Any pleading or other document filed with the court is confidential, is not a public record, and must not be released other than to a party in a suit affecting the child, the party’s attorney, an attorney ad litem, or guardian ad litem.

Texas Family Code §262.308(b) and (d)

All identifying information about a person who delivers the infant to the DEIC provider is confidential and must not be released other than to a party in a suit affecting the child, the party’s attorney, an attorney ad litem, or guardian ad litem. This section does not prevent DFPS from serving notice, when required, to a parent in a suit to terminate parental rights.

Texas Family Code §262.308(a)

Parents cannot be criminally prosecuted for abandoning an infant under the Baby Moses law.

Texas Penal Code §22.041(h)

2362.2 Disposition of a Baby Moses Case

CPS October 2006 November 2007

The intent of the Baby Moses law is to prevent parents from abandoning infants in unsafe locations.

Although delivering an unharmed infant to a designated emergency infant care (DEIC) provider could otherwise meet the statutory definition of abandonment, the parent has abandoned the infant in a location that is legally designated as a safe haven.

If a case meets all of the necessary criteria for a Baby Moses case because the infant was not left in a situation in which he or she would be exposed to harm, the case is not investigated as abandonment and the disposition of the case is Ruled Out.

2362.3 When the Identity or Location of the Parent is Known

CPS October 2006

To avoid the risk of a termination decree being invalidated, it is as important to serve a parent with notice of a suit to terminate parental rights, as it is in any other case when DFPS knows a parent’s identity or location.

Due process in such cases requires DFPS to serve the parent, unless the parent waives service.

The notice may be served in person, or DFPS must make diligent efforts to locate the parent, and if unsuccessful the notice may be made by publication. See 5261 Diligent Search for Missing Parents.

When serving notice to a parent in this situation, every effort should be made to keep the parent’s identity anonymous to the extent possible.

Any questions about service should be referred to the regional attorney or the county or district attorney representing DFPS in the case.

2362.3 2362.4 When Someone Claims to Be a Parent or Relative of the Infant

CPS October 2006 November 2007

Parent of the Infant

If someone claims to be the parent of the infant before the court renders a final order terminating parental rights, DFPS must notify the court.

The court is required by statute to order genetic testing to determine parentage, unless parentage has previously been established.

Texas Family Code §263.407(b)

Relative of the Infant

If someone comes forward claiming to be a relative of the infant before the court renders a final order terminating parental rights, DFPS does not share any information with the individual except the cause number of the court case. DFPS informs the person that if he or she wants to be involved in the case, he or she must intervene in the court case.

adoption, child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, children, cps, domestic violence, families, family, foster care, german shepherd, love, safety, texas
Editing the layout

If you are a regular reader of my blog, you’ll probably notice the changes as I am playing around with the layouts available.  I would love some input on what you like best?  What information you might be looking for but can’t find.  I would like to do what I can to enhance your visit to my blog as the topics I present here are rather dismal and difficult…. though necessary.

0093-adobe-id-220aspqb101-401.jpg

Thank you for your feedback!

child, children, families, family, healing, love, medical, medication, safety
Government Advisers: Don’t Use Cold Medicines in Children Under 6

FDA Says Over-the-Counter Med Need Further Study

Cold medicine

Concentrated Tylenol Infants’ Drops Plus Cold & Cough, right, and Pedia Care Infant Drops Long-Acting Cough, left, is shown in a medicine cabinet of the home of Carol Uyeno in Palo Alto, Calif., Thursday, Oct. 11, 2007. Cold Drug makers voluntarily pulled cold medicines targeted for babies and toddlers off the market Thursday, leaving parents to find alternatives for hacking coughs and runny little noses just as fall sniffles get in full swing. The move represented a pre-emptive strike by over-the-counter drug manufacturers – a week before government advisers were to debate the medicines’ fate. But it doesn’t end concern about the safety of these remedies for youngsters.  (Paul Sakuma/AP Photo)

WASHINGTON – Cold and cough medicines don’t work in children and shouldn’t be used in those younger than 6, federal health advisers recommended Friday.

Video

No More Kids Cold Medicine

The over-the-counter medicines should be studied further, even after decades in which children have received billions of doses a year, the outside experts told the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA isn’t required to follow the advice of its panels of outside experts but does so most of the time.

“The data that we have now is they don’t seem to work,” said Sean Hennessy, a University of Pennsylvania epidemiologist, one of the FDA experts gathered to examine the medicines sold to treat common cold symptoms. The recommendation applies to medicines containing one or more of the following ingredients: decongestants, expectorants, antihistamines and antitussives.

The nonbinding recommendation is likely to lead to a shake up in how the medicines – which have long escaped much scrutiny – are labeled, marketed and used. Just how and how quickly wasn’t immediately clear.

In two separate votes, the panelists said the medicines shouldn’t be used in children younger than 2 or in those younger than 6. A third vote, to recommend against use in children 6 to 11, failed.

Earlier, the panelists voted unanimously to recommend the medicines be studied in children to determine whether they work. That recommendation would require the FDA to undertake a rule-making process to reclassify the medicines, since the ingredients they include are now generally recognized as safe and effective, which doesn’t require testing. The process could take years, even before any studies themselves get under way.

Simply relabeling the medicines to state they shouldn’t be used in some age groups could be accomplished more quickly, FDA officials said.

Indeed, the drug industry could further revise the labels on the medicines to caution against such use. The Thursday-Friday meeting came just a week after the industry pre-emptively moved to eliminate sales of the nonprescription drugs targeted at children under 2.

Government Advisers: Don’t Use Cold Medicines in Children Under 6

adoption, child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, children, cps, families, family, foster care, government, healing, love, medicaid fraud, psychiatry, psychotropic medications, safety, system failure, texas
Child agency touts progress

Foster kid adoption rate has improved in S.A. region, but much wor

Web Posted: 10/03/2007 12:00 AM CDT

Nancy Martinez
Express-News Child Protective Services has in the past 21/2 years seen a higher turnover among caseworkers, taken on more cases, removed more children that it can place and seen a large gap in the number of black children in the system versus those in the community. Still, the state agency charged with keeping children safe sees itself as an improved department in the throes of heeding reforms required by the Legislature in 2005. That’s what about 75 child advocates who gathered Tuesday at a semi-annual child advocate meeting heard from CPS officials.

“We’re making a lot of progress. We’re a different agency than we were before the reforms,” Sherry Gomez, the San Antonio region CPS director, told the audience of foster care workers, community organizations, law enforcement officials and political leaders. “But it’s going to take awhile to transition.”

But Sen. Carlos Uresti, D-San Antonio, who publicly criticized CPS this year for not following new state laws aimed at protecting young children by requiring that a specialist review their cases, reached a different conclusion.

“I don’t see the kind of improvement we need in the agency,” Uresti said during a phone interview Tuesday. “Status quo is not enough.”

At the meeting, held at the University of the Incarnate Word with the theme “The Dawn of a New Day,” CPS officials spoke about what the department is doing right and characterized its weaknesses — turnover is the worst it’s ever been and there are more cases than ever — as “growing pains.”

“CPS is a constant challenge. The system is overburdened, and we always need more reserves,” said Arabia Vargas, chairwoman of the Bexar County Child Welfare Board.

Still, there were marked improvements since the passage of Senate Bill 6, which required expansive reforms in virtually every aspect of policy, practice and performance for the beleaguered agency.

CPS touted its high foster child adoption rate: In fiscal 2007, 974 children in the San Antonio region were adopted, mostly by relatives. Last year, the region led the state with 651 adoptions, a vast improvement from the 316 in fiscal year 2004 and up from 625 in 2005.

Also discussed were the “taking it to the streets” efforts, in which caseworkers became decentralized, working across the city, and CPS’ “family team meeting” efforts, in which extended family members work with CPS to craft a safety plan for children.

Local CPS developments are reflective of what is happening across the state.

On Sept. 1, in its fourth 180-day progress report, the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, the umbrella agency over CPS, reported to lawmakers that the department is becoming more accountable and working on its shortcomings.

According to CPS, caseloads are also down for most caseworkers — from 27 average cases per day last year for San Antonio region caseworkers to 21 per day in fiscal year 2007, which ended Aug. 31. Statewide, the caseload decreased from 26 per day last year to 20 per day in 2007, according to CPS.

But one of the department’s biggest challenges this past year has been placing foster children.

Since April, 44 children in the San Antonio region have slept in CPS offices because there was nowhere else for them to stay.

CPS officials say finding placements is a daily struggle because the rate at which children are being removed is greatly outpacing the rate at which foster parents will take them.

CPS officials said the department is also striving to fix a problem of disproportional removals. Across the state and in San Antonio, more black children are taken from their parents. In the San Antonio region, 6 percent of children are black, but 15 percent of those in foster care are black, CPS reported.

Training new staff has become a significant challenge, especially because caseworker turnover is getting worse.

Despite the reforms, children are still dying of child abuse and neglect at an unprecedented rate.

In fiscal year 2006, CPS identified 14 children who died of child abuse and neglect, the second-highest number since the department began keeping track.

Death numbers for fiscal year 2007 are not yet available.

“The report reflects the status quo,” Uresti said. “We need to continue to monitor this on a monthly basis and not let up on our primary goal of protecting our children.”


nmartinez@express-news.net

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, family, foster care, General, government, love, missing child, social services, system failure
In Memory: These children died In the government’s care in the name of “safety”

 

These children were killed or died AFTER they were taken into CPS’s custody for allegations of abuse/neglect against their caretakers at their natural home

.

In Memory

There are two parts of this list that get me the most in a shuddering chills kind of way –

  • First, is how many times i roll the scroll ball in the middle of my mouse to scroll through the whole list… it keeps going and going and going;  

  • Second, I can’t imagine how bad it has to have been for a child who is removed from their home and placed in a foster home to commit suicide at age 12; how many 12 year olds commit suicide?

One is too many.

1.. Genesis Acosta-Garcia, Las Vegas Nevada, three months old, November 19, 2005, septic shock

2.. Travis C Adams, Salem Oregon, August 8 2000, December 16 2002, wandered into creek

3.. Kayla Y Allen, Richlands North Carolina, November 10 1995 – August 24 2003, poison

4.. Martin Lee Anderson, Panama City Florida, fourteen years old, January 6 2006, beating/sickle cell

5.. Richard L (Ricky) Aragon, Albuquerque New Mexico, January 24 1991 – April 12 1993, battered

6.. Shirley Arciszewski, Charlotte North Carolina, April 19 1992 – September 11 2004, restraint

7.. Miguel Humberto Arias-Baca, Westminster Colorado, two years old, February 2 1999, battered

8.. Ian August, Sevier Desert Utah, June 21 1988 – July 13, 2002, exhaustion

9.. Denzel Bailey, Los Angeles California, eleven months old, April 2001, malnutrition

10.. Jeffrey Baldwin, Toronto Ontario, December 20 1996 – November 30 2002, malnutrition/pneumonia

11.. Casey Paul Barrow, West Valley Utah, eighteen months old, October 22, 2003, battered

12.. Anthony Bars, Indiana, four years old, January 20 2004, starvation, battered

13.. Shelly Bash, Midland Michigan, eight years old, March 2005, transplant rejection

14.. Nadine Catherine Beaulieu, Dauphin Manitoba, twenty three months old, February 1996, battered

15.. Teddy Bellingham, Smiths Falls Ontario, sixteen years old, August 1992, beaten

16.. Jerome Bennett, Oshawa Ontario, fifteen years old, February 3 2006, homicide

17.. Maria Bennett, Lancaster Ohio, two years old, October 23, 2002, battered

18.. Modesto Blanco, Lubbock Texas, twenty two months old, March 2 2002,battered

19.. Christian Blewitt né sik, Halesowen England, three years old, December 2002, poison/battered

20.. Deondre Bondieumaitre, Florida, sixteen months old, April 16 2003,battered

21.. Timothy Boss, Remsen Iowa, ten years old, February 23 2000, battered

22.. Alex Boucher, New Port Richey Florida, January 25 1997 – September 25 2000, asphyxiation

23.. Ashley Boyd, LaFayette Georgia, twelve years old, December 13 2005, hit by car / suicide

24.. Kerry Brooks, Los Angeles California, nine years old, February 10 2001, suicide

25.. Talitha Brooks, Colorado, one year old, July 1998, heatstroke

26.. Amira Brown, Reading Pennsylvania, twelve years old, September 4 2005, battered / restraint

27.. Diminiqua Bryant, Dothan Alabama, two years old, May 1999, battered

28.. Scott Buckle, Swansea Wales, twelve years old, February 6 2005, hanging

29.. Latasha Bush, Manvel Texas, January 2 1987 – February 28 2002, restraint

30.. Michael Buxton, Miami Oklahoma, five years old, July 5 1998, battered

31.. Eduardo Calzada, Bakersfield California, three months old, March 2004, battered

32.. Chris Campbell, Toledo Iowa, thirteen years old, November 2, 1997, restraint

33.. Gladys Campbell, Philadelphia/New Jersey, two years old, ca 1988

34.. Edith Campos, Tucson Arizona, fifteen years old, February 4 1998, restraint

35.. Latasha Cannon, Boston Massachusetts, seventeen years old, April 2001, slashed throat

36.. Mario Cano, Chula Vista California, sixteen years old, April 27 1984, untreated blood clot

37.. Joshua K Causey, Detroit Michigan, March 21 1998 – March 18 2003, battered

38.. Sherry Charlie, British Columbia, nineteen months old, September 4 2002, battered

39.. Sarah Angelina Chavez, Alhambra California, two years old, October 11 2005, battered

40.. Felix Chen, Bloomington Indiana, August 27 1997 – April 1 2004, treatment withheld

41.. Sky Colon Cherevez, Paterson New Jersey, three months old, August 6, 1998, battered

42.. Tiffany H Clair, Fort Worth Texas, September 6 1985 – May 4 2001, heroin

43.. Brian Clark, New Jersey, three years old, January 2002, untreated pneumonia

44.. Angelic Clary, Bakersfield California, three months old September 14 2003

45.. Roshelle Clayborn, San Antonio Texas, sixteen years old, August 18 1997, restraint

46.. Casey Collier, Westminster Colorado, seventeen years old, December 21 1993, restraint

47.. Desiree Collins, Los Angeles California, fourteen years old, February 10 2002, gunshot

48.. Nicholas Contreras, Queen Creek Arizona, January 15 1982 – March 2 1998, untreated infection

49.. Adrianna Cram, Veracruz Mexico (US supervision), August 25 2000 – June 13 2005

50.. Christopher Henry Cryderman, Springfield Missouri, July 27 2004 – November 22 2004, untreated infection

51.. Dirk D Dalton, Clarkston Washington, June 7 1989 – May 1 1994, battered

52.. Arieale Daniels, Naples Florida, fifteen years old, 1999, car crash

53.. Tajuana Davidson, Phoenix Arizona, three years old, November 3 1993, battered

54.. China Marie Davis, Phoenix Arizona, March 23 1991 – October 31 1993, battered

55.. Sabrina Elizabeth Day, Charlotte North Carolina, July 4 1984 – February 10 2000, restraint

56.. Tyler Jospeh DeLeon, Stevens County Washington, January 13 1998 – January 13 2005, dehydration

57.. Kameron Justin Demery, Long Beach California, two years old, October 14 1996, battered

58.. Connre Dixon, Ridgefield Township Onio eleven years old, October 18, 2004, stabbing

59.. Mark Draheim, Orefield Pennsylvania, October 10 1984 – December 11 1998, restraint

60.. Charmaria Drake, Cleveland Ohio, twenty months old, March 13 2003, battered

61.. Stephanie Duffield, Manvel Texas, July 14 1984 – February 11 2001, restraint

62.. Willie Lawrence Durden III, Citrus County Florida, seventeen years old, October 2005, unknown/died in cell

63.. Brian Edgar, Overland Park Kansas, nine years old, December 30 2002, asphyxiation

64.. William Edgar, Peterborough Ontario, thirteen years old, March 1999, restraint

65.. Tiffany Eilders, Rancho Cucamonga California, fourteen weeks old, December 7 2005, battered

66.. Kayla Erlandson, King County Washington, two years old, April 1991, battered

67.. Luke Evans, Lowell Indiana, sixteen months old, November 30 2001, malnutrition/battered

68.. Roberta (Berta) Evers, Bayfield Colorado, six years old, June 13 1998, restraint

69.. Sara Eyerman, California, twenty months old, ca 1986, untreated pneumonia

70.. Miranda Finn, Lake Butler Florida, nine years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

71.. Laura Fleming, Palmdale California, October 11 2004 – November 21 2004, cause unknown

72.. Sarah Jane Forrester, Woodlawn Maryland, October 30 1985 – found May 13 1999, battered and stabbed

73.. Kameryn Fountain, Bibb County Georgia, two months old, November 20 2005, unknown cause

74.. Henry Gallop, Boston Massachusetts, two years old, 1987, poison

75.. Alexander Ganadonegro, Albuquerque New Mexico, March 10 1998, February 4 1999, battered

76.. Christening (Mikie) Garcia, Ingram Texas, twelve years old, December 4 2005, restraint

77.. Dylan George, Fremont California, April 16 2002 – October 4 2004, battered

78.. Corese Goldman, Chicago Illinois, two years old, 1995, drowning

79.. Mollie Gonzales, Jefferson County Colorado, ten years old, November 18 2002, drug overdose

80.. Julio Gonzalez, Glendale California, May 10 1995 – December 29 1996, battered

81.. Elizabeth (Lizzy) Goodwin, Coeur d’Alene Idaho, March 22 1996 – October 22 2002, drowning

82.. Anthony Green, Brownwood Texas, fifteen years old, May 12 1991, restraint

83.. Sabrina Green, New York City, nine years old, November 8 1997, burned and battered

84.. Lamar D Greene, Jacksonville Florida, sixteen years old, 2001, car crash

85.. Corey Greer, Treasure Island Florida, four months old, ca 1985, dehydration

86.. Gage Guillen, Boston Massachusetts, three years old, 1995, strangulation

87.. Darvell Gulley, Lincoln Nebraska, thirteen years old, April 27 2002, restraint

88.. Savannah Brianna Marie Hall, Prince George British Columbia, September 9 1997 – January 21 2001, malnutrition/restraint

89.. Latiana Hamilton, Jacksonville Florida, seventeen months old,July 18 2001, drowning

90.. Mykeeda Hampton, District of Columbia, two years old, August 1997, battered

91.. Kelly M Hancock, Malden Massachusetts, November 6 1985 – July 18 2000, stabbed

92.. Laura Hanson, West Palm Beach Florida, May 17 1981 – November 19 1998, restraint

93.. Jerrell Hardiman, La Porte Indiana, four years old, October ca 1993, exposure

94.. Diane Harris, Seguin Texas, seventeen years old, April 11 1990, restraint

95.. Jessica Albina Hagmann, Prince William County Virginia, two years old, August 11 2003, smothered

96.. Letia Harrison, Akron Ohio, October 23 1999 – September 19 2002, baked in attic

97.. Jordan Heikamp, Toronto Ontario, May 19 1997 – June 23 1997, starvation

98.. Eric Hernandez, Cedar Hill Texas, January 6 1999 – March 7 1999, suffocation

99.. Zachary Higier, Massachusetts, May 24 2000 – August 15 2002, battered

100.. Dwight Hill, Tucson Arizona, four months old, November 16 2005, cause unknown

101.. Nina Victoria Hilt né¥ Vika Bazhenova, Manassas Virginia, thirty three months old, July 2 2005, battered

102.. Steven A Hoffa, Des Moines Iowa, February 4 1993 – May 18 1996, battered

103.. Richard (Ricky) Holland, Williamston Michigan, September 8 1997 – July 2005, battered

104.. Michael Anthony Hughes, Choctaw Oklahoma, March 21 1988 – September 12 1994, kidnap/missing

105.. Joseph (Joey) Huot, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, two years old, January 27 1988, battered

106.. Dion Jack, Sproat Lake British Columbia, six years old, March 1 2006, untreated seizure

107.. Walter Jackson, Chicago Illinois, ten months old, August 9 2005, battered

108.. Dominic James, Springfield Missouri, June 4 2000 – August 21 2002, battered

109.. Billie-Jo Jenkins, Hastings East Sussex England, thirteen years old, February 1997, battered

110.. Demetrius Jeffries, Crockett Texas, seventeen years old, August 26 1997, strangulation

111.. Dontel Jeffers, Boston Massachusetts, four years old, March 6 2005, battered

112.. Stephanie Jobin, Brampton Ontario, thirteen years old, June 21 1998, restraint

113.. Aaron Johnson, Boston Massachusetts, fifteen months old, 1987, poison

114.. Xolani Nkosi Johnson, Cape town South Africa, twelve years old, June 2 2001, AIDS

115.. Elijah James Johnson, Los Angeles California, three years old,May 10 1999, scalded

116.. Lorenzo Johnson, Queen Creek Arizona, 17 years old – June 27, 1994, drowned during escape

117.. Quartrina K (Snappy) Johnson, Pikesville Maryland, December 25 1988-July 20 2004, beaten and choked

118.. Christal Jones, New York City (Vermont ward), May 24 1984 – January 3 2001, suffocation

119.. David L Jones, Chicago Illinois, April 15 1992 – March 7 1998, battered

120.. Dennis Jurgens né Serry Sherwood, White Bear Lake Minnesota, three years old, April 11 1965, battered

121.. Marissa (Shorty) Karp, Pompano Beach Florida, December 6 1985 – August 19 2002, gunshot

122.. David Ryan Keeley, New Haven Connecticut, six years old, August 12 1998, battered

123.. Ashley Keen, Lake Butler Florida, thirteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

124.. Cassandra Killpack, Springville Utah, November 29 1997 – June 9 2002, water therapy

125.. Ahmad King né ‘awls, Alma Georgia, three years old, January 24 2006, homicide

126.. Heather Michell Kish, Berlin Township Michigan, September 15 1987 – found October 6 2002, murdered

127.. Noah Knapp, Marysville Washington, six years old, May 30 2005, automobile collision

128.. Zaire Knott, Newark New Jersey, September 16 2005 – October 20 2005, cause unknown

129.. Anatoli Kolenda, Westfield Massachusetts, May 20 1991 – October 20 2002, stabbing

130.. Yana Kolenda, Westfield Massachusetts, December 31 1990 – October 20 2002, stabbing

131.. Anthony Lamb, Lake Butler Florida, twenty months old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

132.. Keisha Shardae Lane, Hagerstown Maryland, fifteen years old, August 17 2005, gunshot

133.. Shawn Lawrence né ndy Mohler, Shelton Washington, ten years old, October 9 1999, drowning

134.. Brittany Legler, Millcreek Pennsylvania, fifteen years old, May 9 2004, battered

135.. Jacob Lindorff, Franklin Township New Jersey, five years old December 14 2001, battered

136.. Christian Liz, New York City, three weeks old, November 29 2004, suffocation

137.. James Lonnee, Guelph/Hamilton Ontario, sixteen years old, September 7 1996, beaten by cellmate

138.. Gregory Love, Florida, twenty three months old, April 2005, head injury

139.. Nikki Lutke, Cheyenne Wyoming, five years old, August 28 2003, drowning

140.. Zachary James Lyons, Winston-Salem North Carolina, January 24 1992 – October 8 1996, battered

141.. Shaquella Mance, Belton South Carolina, seven months old, March 27 2005, battered

142.. Elizabeth Mann, Lake Butler Florida, fifteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

143.. Heaven Mann, Lake Butler Florida, three years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

144.. Johnny Mann, Lake Butler Florida, thirteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

145.. Cynthia Nicole (Nicki) Mann, Lake Butler Florida, fifteen years old, January 25 2006, traffic accident

146.. Logan Marr, Chelsea Maine, October 14 1995 – January 31 2001, asphyxiation

147.. Stephanie Martinez, Pueblo Colorado, five years old, December 31 2001, untreated burns

148.. Tiffany Laverne Mason, Folsom California, June 11 1986 – August 9 2001, battered

149.. Viktor Alexander Matthey né – Sergeyevich Tulimov, Hunterdon County New Jersey, six years old, October 31 2000, hypothermia

150.. Dominic Matz, Osawatomie Kansas, July 6 2002 – February 15 2004, treatment withheld

151.. Jamie Mayne, Atascadero California, March 24 1995 – February 10 2000, battered

152.. Kristal Mayon-Ceniceros, Chula Vista California, sixteen years old, February 5 1999, restraint

153.. Emily Ann Mays, Tucson Arizona, sixteen months old, August 24 2005, battered

154.. Andrew McClain, Bridgeport Connecticut, December 6 1986 – March 22 1998, restraint

155.. Cory Bradley McLaughlin, North Carolina, four years old, July 4 1997, battered

156.. Jerry McLaurin, Brownwood Texas, fourteen years old, November 2 1999, restraint

157.. Maria Mendoza, Katy Texas, fourteen years old, October 12 2002,restraint

158.. Caleb Jerome Merchant, Edmonton Alberta, thirteen months old, November 26, 2005, battered

159.. Denis Merryman né .ritsky, Harford County Maryland, eight years old, January 2005, starvation

160.. Jacob Miller, Georgia, twenty two months old, November 20 1997, battered

161.. Clayton Miracle, Georgia, three years old, August 11 1993, battered

162.. Hanna Denise Montessori, Santa Ana California, March 16 1988 – January 19 2004, homicide/head-injury

163.. Alfredo Montez, Auburndale Florida, two years old, July 1 2002, battered

164.. Zachary Moran, Charlotte North Carolina, fourteen months old, August 8 2003, battered

165.. Christina Morlan, Scott County Iowa, September 3 2003 – November 30 2003, unknown

166.. Carlyle Mullins, Nashville Tennessee, five years old, May 27 2005, battered

167.. Cedrick Napoleon, Killeen Texas, June 26 1987 – March 7 2002, restraint

168.. Candace Newmaker né¥ C Tiara Elmore, Colorado, November 19 1989 – April 19 2000, re-birth asphyxiation

169.. Jonathan Nichol, Cook County Illinois, two years old, June 16 1995, drowning

170.. Trevor Nolan, Mono County California, five years old, April 12 1997, treatment withheld

171.. Sierra Odom, Arlington Texas, three years old, August 11 2005, battered

172.. Keron Owens, Walterboro South Carolina, three years old, January 19 1992, battered

173.. Sean Paddock né ?ord, Johnston County North Carolina, four years old, February 26 2006, battered

174.. Omar Paisley, Miami Florida, seventeen years old, June 2003, untreated appendicitis

175.. Terrell Parker, Buffalo New York, two years old, 2003, battered

176.. Travis Parker, Cleveland Georgia, thirteen years old, April 21 2005, restraint

177.. Alex Pavlis, Schaumburg Illinois, six years old, December 19 2003, battered

178.. Dawn Renay Perry, Manvel Texas, sixteen years old, April 10 1993, restraint

179.. Angellica Pesante, Seneca County New York, four years old, April 18 1997, battered

180.. Terrell Peterson, Atlanta Georgia, five years old, January 16 1998, battered

181.. Cynteria Phillips, Miami Florida, December 10 1986 – August 14 2000, rape/murder

182.. Marguerite Pierre, West Orange New Jersey, five years old, December 2005, poison

183.. Emporia Pirtle, Indiana, six years old, November 11 1996, battered

184.. Jason Plischkowsky, Southampton England, May 25 1985 – December 19 1986, head injury

185.. Huntly Tamati Pokaia, New Zealand, three years old

186.. David Polreis, Greeley Colorado, two years old, February 6 1996, battered

187.. Maryah Ponce, Rialto California, December 5 1997 – June 29 2001, baked in car

188.. Constance S Porter, Kearney Missouri, July 20 1998 – February 12 2001, battered

189.. Dakota Denzel Prince-Smith, Lancaster California, five years old, July 8 2003, baked in car

190.. Nehamiah Nate Prince-Smith, Lancaster California, three years old, July 8 2003, baked in car

191.. Karen Quill, St Louis Saskatchewan, twenty months old,September 13 1997, internal injuries

192.. Rodrigo Armando Rameriez Jr, Victorville California, eighteen months old, July 6 2001, drowning

193.. Stephanie Ramos, New York City, eight years old, July 9 2005,dumped in garbage can

194.. Bobby Jo Randolph, Houston Texas, seventeen years old, September 26 1996, asphyxiation

195.. Jacquelyn Reah, Grand Rapids Michigan, ten years old, November 27 2004, runaway / hit by car

196.. Latayna Reese, Bradenton Florida, fifteen years old, April 1996

197.. Caprice Reid, New York City, four years old, June 1997, starved and battered

198.. Jonathan Reid, Gardena California, nine years old, June 9 1997treatment withheld

199.. Matthew Reid, Welland Ontario, three years old, December 15 2005, suffocation

200.. Dustin Rhodes, Litchfield Park Arizona, nine years old, August 13 2003, battered

201.. Eric Roberts, Keene Texas, June 16 1979 – February 22 1996, restraint

202.. Ana Rogers, Sparks Nevada, four months old, July 2005, pre-existing injury

203.. Genevieve “Genny” Rojas, Chula Vista California, four years old, July 21 1995, starvation, scalded

204.. Paola Rosales, Milton Ontario, fourteen years old, July 3 2001, suicide

205.. Kyle Anthony Ross, Massachusetts, September 7 1995 – June 9 2001, rottweiler

206.. Marlon Santos, Worcester Massachusetts, five months old, November 5 1998, missing

207.. Andres E Saragos, Warm Springs Oregon, August 5 1995 – July 13 2000, baked in car

208.. Gina M Score, Plankinton South Dakota, May 7 1985 – July 21 1999, baked by boot camp

209.. Caprice Scott, Florida, infant, 1999, mother in foster care

210.. Ryan Scott, Sheffield Lake Ohio, two years old, March 27 1998, battered

211.. Krystal Scurry, Aiken County South Carolina, February 1989 – November 2 1991, rape/murder

212.. Andrew (Andy) Setzer, California, April 27 1995 – August 2 1999, battered

213.. Ariel Shaw, Bibb County Georgia, nineteen months old, January 26 2000, battered

214.. Vivan Uk Sheppard, Jacksonville Florida, eight months old, May 15 1999, suffocation

215.. Joseph H Shriver, Pennsylvania, March 2 1997 – October 5 1997, battered

216.. Quincey L Simmons, Omaha Nebraska, August 21 1997 – March 24 2001, battered

217.. Christopher Simpson, Michigan, seven years old, November 14 1998, fire

218.. Jordan Simpson Howell Morrison II, Howell Michigan, five years old, November 14 1998, fire

219.. Nicole Simpson , Michigan, seven years old, November 14 1998, fire

220.. Devin A Slade, Milwaukee Wisconsin, October 23 2000 – June 19 2001, asphyxiation

221.. John Smith, Fishersgate England, four years old, December 24 1999, battered and bitten

222.. Mikinah Smith, Cincinnati Ohio, one year old, March 18 2003, battered

223.. Tristan Sovern, Greensboro North Carolina, sixteen years old, March 4 1998, restraint

224.. Jushai Spurgeon, North Las Vegas Nevada, fourteen months old, April 3 2005, scalding

225.. LeRon St John, Detroit Michigan, fifteen years old, March 1 2003, untreated tuberculosis

226.. Lloyd Stamp, Edmonton Alberta, seventeen years old, September 29, 2005, suicide

227.. Tommy Stacey, Carmichael California, three months old, January 3 2005, SIDS

228.. Elizabeth (Lisa) Steinberg né¥ Launders, New York City, May 14 1981 – November 4 1987, battered

229.. Yasmin Taylor, Paterson New Jersey, seven months old, May 8 1994, virus

230.. Lakeysha Tharp, Irmo South Carolina, six months old, April 7 2004, asphyxiation

231.. Adam Michael Thimyan, Riverview Florida, October 2 1986 – April 3 2004, gunshot

232.. Timithy Thomas, Banner Elk North Carolina, nine years old, March 11 1999, restraint

233.. Liam Thompson né “mitry S Ishlankulov, Columbus Ohio, October 3 1999 – October 3 2002, scalding

234.. Michael Tinning, Schenectady New York, two years old, March 2 1981, asphyxiation

235.. Kelly Ann Tozer, Egg Harbor City New Jersey, eighteen months old, July 30 2005, drowning

236.. Patrick Trauffler, Phoenix Arizona, six weeks old, February 18 2003, battered

237.. Demetrius Tyler, Johnson City Tennessee, six months old, November 10 2004, drowning

238.. Tyler Vanpopering, Southgate Michigan, September 23 2003 – April 14 2004, battered

239.. Jacqueline Venay, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, six years old, September 21 1998, battered

240.. George Walker III, DeKalb County Georgia, ten months old, November 7, 2002, choking

241.. Michelle Walton, Boston Massachusetts, October 6 1994, asphyxiation

242.. Erickyzha Warner, Utica New York, July 19 2002 – May 31, 2004, untreated burns

243.. Shane Devell Washington, Fresno California, fifteen months old, circa 1996, drowning

244.. Evan Watkins, Las Vegas Nevada, twenty one months old, July 11 1996, battered

245.. Devin Wilder, Cleveland Ohio, July 29 1998 – April 21 2001, battered

246.. Dominic J Williams, Saint Louis Missouri, June 8 1987 – June 3 2004,strangulation

247.. Andrew Wilson, Owensboro Kentucky, three years old, August 7 2005, drowning

248.. Lorenzo J Wilson, Seattle Washington, January 29 2004 – October 22 2004, battered

249.. Rilya Wilson, Florida, born September 29 1996, disappeared 2001

250.. Michael Spencer Wiltsie, Silver Springs Florida, September 18 1987 – February 5, 2000, restraint

251.. Jimmy Allan Wood, Adams County Colorado, fourteen years old, November 13 2002, drug overdose

252.. Jonnie Wood, Springdale Arkansas, eight years old, August 13 2005, drowning

253.. Braxton D Wooden, Missouri, May 15 1997 – June 2 2005, gunshot

254.. Donte L Woods, West Palm Beach Florida, February 25 1986 – May 27 2002, gunshot

255.. Thomas (T J) Wright, Providence Rhode Island, three years old, October 31 2004, battered

256.. Willie Wright, San Antonio Texas, fourteen years old, March 4 2000, restraint

257.. Rufus Manzie Young Jr, Michigan, four years old, April 6 2003, battered

cps, funding, General, social workers
UW School of Social Work will pay students’ tuition

I’m not sure how I feel about this.  I think its a good thing, promotes educating social workers which we all know is important.  However other career students have to pay for their schooling, why shouldn’t they? Then again there is a shortage in good social workers, its hard to find people for that position, its a toughie.  Any comments? I’d love to hear from you.

by Liz Frantz
Monday, October 1, 2007

The recently developed Public Child Welfare Training Program in the University of Wisconsin School of Social Work will pay students’ tuition in exchange for a promise that, upon graduation, the students will work in Wisconsin’s public child welfare system for at least one year.

The program would cover the cost of a Master’s degree for social work students.

UW’s School of Social Work is consistently ranked among the best schools in the country.

“Jobs graduates usually take after graduation are in children’s protective services, special needs adoption and foster care,” Susan Michaud, a social work lecturer and CWTP coordinator said. “But there are never enough people willing to work in children’s protective services, so we continue to educate and train people to enter that line of work in the CWTP program.”

The program aims to combat inadequate professional preparation by requiring all trainees to complete a specialized curriculum aimed at preparation for employment. This program is intended to help students develop into superior child welfare specialists.

“Training and education includes rigorous coursework, as well as field placement in public child welfare agencies, such as the Rock and Dane County Human Services,” Michaud said.

The child welfare training program admits between 12 and 15 students each year and accepts up to 120 students overall, according to the School of Social Work’s website.

Using federal funds distributed by the state Department of Health and Family Services, the seven-year-old program is making strides toward filling more and more open social work positions in Wisconsin, Michaud said.

Michaud believes that if students get a high-quality education in public child welfare, they are more likely to continue on into a career in child welfare services as well.

National studies show child welfare workers are most likely to leave the field within the first two years, often because they are insufficiently prepared for what they will experience on the job, according to a UW press release.

Jill Kvigney, a UW alumnus and CWTP participant, said her field studies in child abuse investigation left her very well prepared for a future career in child welfare.

“It gave me an opportunity to learn a lot about child welfare work in a non-threatening work environment,” Kvigney said. “I was able to not worry about my paycheck or my boss, and just take in the information every day.”

Kvigney added the program was an incredible learning experience, which was made more effective by the time she spent in child welfare agencies.

Candace Harrison, a UW alumnus and former CWTP member, added the overall goal of the program is to prepare trainees in the child welfare field for their future careers.

“In my experience, I can say that the classes I took in the program provided me with a profound knowledge base for my future career,” Harrison said.

Michaud said the most satisfying thing about being involved in the UW School of Social Work’s CWTP program is keeping track of graduated students’ careers in child welfare.

“It’s very gratifying to see the vast majority of former participants stay in public welfare, and to see them happy and fulfilled in their professions,” Michaud said.