Category: missing child

child welfare reform, foster care abuse, collin county, cps, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, government, healing, missing child, system failure
Collin County Father Talks to Its Almost Tuesday

I received an email from the Collin County father asking me to let you all know that they have a full feature film coming out, all proceeds go to their children in a trust fund.

He says they are still fighting to get them back thru the court system in Collin County Texas. They have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to fix this very flawed cps system.

He says, “We know we can not change what happened to our family. We hope we will be able to help other families in the future.”

With that in mind, “any other families from Collin County Texas that have been thrown into the Collin County CPS system, or who have beecn ordered to take parenting classes, domestic abuse classes, psycological examanations, anger management classes etc when found not guilty or ruled out for abuse, please contact Its Almost Tuesday.

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, false allegations, government, healing, missing child, system failure
High court ruling is victory for victims of child abuse in Hawaii

The state Supreme Court has upheld an award to be paid by the state to a Maui girl whose previous injury was under investigation by Child Protective Services.

Child Protective Services has been told by the state Supreme Court that it is responsible for the welfare of children subject to abuse. A $1.1 million judgment was upheld last month by the high court and will hold the agency accountable for future negligence.

The state should increase expenditures for the agency rather than be forced to pay court awards.

The case arose from “very critical” injuries, including broken bones, a torn intestine, severe bruises and bleeding inside the skull, suffered by a 21/2-year-old Maui girl seven years ago, two months after being brought to Maui Memorial Medical Center with a broken leg. Dasia Morales-Kahoohanohano was under the care of her mother, Denise Morales, when the injuries occurred.

A pediatrician at the hospital had told CPS social worker Ellen Brewerton after the first injury that he did not believe her mother harmed the girl and that “the only logical explanation was Denise’s boyfriend (did).” Morales was arrested but neither she nor her then-boyfriend, Darryl Ramos, was prosecuted.

The social worker allowed the weekly exchange in custody between Morales and Dasia’s father, Jarrett Kahoohanohano, to resume on the condition that Dasia not be brought to Ramos’ house. Maui police had informed CPS that Ramos had been convicted of crimes seven times, including household abuse for punching a former girlfriend and biting her nose.

Brewerton went on a two-week vacation five weeks after the broken-leg incident and three days after Ramos and a friend were arrested following a shooting on the Ramos property, but the case was not assigned to another social worker during that fortnight. Dasia’s severe injuries occurred at the Ramos house a week after Brewerton returned to work.

Lillian Koller, director of the Human Services Department, called the Supreme Court’s decision “unfair to Hawaii taxpayers” and “exasperating for our social workers, whose conduct may be condemned no matter what they do.” Vlad Devens, attorney for Dasia, her father and paternal grandfather, suggested the injuries could have been prevented if the CPS had adhered to its own policies.

The court’s unanimous landmark decision does not mean that any injury to a child under CPS’s oversight will end up in court. It does mean that any departure from policy leading to injury can be grounds for a lawsuit.

As Circuit Judge Joel E. August ruled in the case, and the Supreme Court agreed, “DHS’s duty to protect children exists once they are on notice that a significant and unjustifiable or unexplained injury has occurred to a child that is brought to their attention, and there is a reasonable opportunity to verify the injury or the potential risk of future harm.”

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, false allegations, government, healing, missing child, system failure
High court ruling is victory for victims of child abuse in Hawaii

The state Supreme Court has upheld an award to be paid by the state to a Maui girl whose previous injury was under investigation by Child Protective Services.

Child Protective Services has been told by the state Supreme Court that it is responsible for the welfare of children subject to abuse. A $1.1 million judgment was upheld last month by the high court and will hold the agency accountable for future negligence.

The state should increase expenditures for the agency rather than be forced to pay court awards.

The case arose from “very critical” injuries, including broken bones, a torn intestine, severe bruises and bleeding inside the skull, suffered by a 21/2-year-old Maui girl seven years ago, two months after being brought to Maui Memorial Medical Center with a broken leg. Dasia Morales-Kahoohanohano was under the care of her mother, Denise Morales, when the injuries occurred.

A pediatrician at the hospital had told CPS social worker Ellen Brewerton after the first injury that he did not believe her mother harmed the girl and that “the only logical explanation was Denise’s boyfriend (did).” Morales was arrested but neither she nor her then-boyfriend, Darryl Ramos, was prosecuted.

The social worker allowed the weekly exchange in custody between Morales and Dasia’s father, Jarrett Kahoohanohano, to resume on the condition that Dasia not be brought to Ramos’ house. Maui police had informed CPS that Ramos had been convicted of crimes seven times, including household abuse for punching a former girlfriend and biting her nose.

Brewerton went on a two-week vacation five weeks after the broken-leg incident and three days after Ramos and a friend were arrested following a shooting on the Ramos property, but the case was not assigned to another social worker during that fortnight. Dasia’s severe injuries occurred at the Ramos house a week after Brewerton returned to work.

Lillian Koller, director of the Human Services Department, called the Supreme Court’s decision “unfair to Hawaii taxpayers” and “exasperating for our social workers, whose conduct may be condemned no matter what they do.” Vlad Devens, attorney for Dasia, her father and paternal grandfather, suggested the injuries could have been prevented if the CPS had adhered to its own policies.

The court’s unanimous landmark decision does not mean that any injury to a child under CPS’s oversight will end up in court. It does mean that any departure from policy leading to injury can be grounds for a lawsuit.

As Circuit Judge Joel E. August ruled in the case, and the Supreme Court agreed, “DHS’s duty to protect children exists once they are on notice that a significant and unjustifiable or unexplained injury has occurred to a child that is brought to their attention, and there is a reasonable opportunity to verify the injury or the potential risk of future harm.”

Add new tag, cps, domestic violence, false allegations, government, missing child, system failure
Before he was caught for child rape….


Who was he, before he was a convicted pedophile? He was the reason a child’s life was destroyed.

After PLEADING GUILTY to several counts of aggravated SEXUAL ASSAULT ON A MINOR, COMPELLING PROSTITUTION, and SEXUAL PERFORMANCE BY A CHILD, Ronnie Cummings was the instigator & co-conspirator in a plot to separate another little boy and his mother. Why would he do such a thing? Out of malice & out of spite following a divorce that left him holding a permanent protective order and a $50,000.00 past due child support bill.

The end result was a little boy, who. at 8 years old, was very aware of the situations around him. He was very bonded to his mother, and was ripped from his home, put into a foster home (where his fear of being kidnapped began); and ultimately, he was abused in foster care, overmedicated by the government to the point of seizures and medical side effects, and he lost his mother & stepfather who raised him, his dog, his friends, home, and life.

During the entire time he ruined that little boys life, he was molesting other children. Ronnie Cummings is a danger to children, and should he be returned to society, would, undoubtedly, re-offend.

The little boy’s mother has not seen him in 3 years. She does not even have a recent picture. The child is out there somewhere but the mother is restrained from coming close to him, even if she did find him, because of the false allegations made by this PEDOPHILE and the coverup the State of Texas scrambled to create to erase their mistakes when they GRANTED VISITATION TO A CHILD MOLESTER after they IGNORE WARNINGS BY THE MOTHER.

So the mother is put to rest when they change the child’s name, put her under a gag order, and threaten jail time if she doesn’t leave it alone.

Thanks Patrick Wilson – Your signing of a reduction in charges FOR A CHILD MOLESTER just took the ONLY peace, serenity, and dreamless sleep that mother had, knowing that monster who didn’t just molest a child he was convicted for.

Ronnie Cummings also terrorized another family, ripped apart a little boy’s life, and it happened because of people like you … people who let Ronnie Cummings get away with his actions. It is in this allowance that Ronnie Cummings (and other abusers) grow bolder and bolder. What next?

Patrick Wilson – you are just like the rest of the pedophiles you support in Ellis County, Texas, sickening.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN to a recording of a visit that reveals what really happens in the Texas Foster Care System.

He came to the visit bruised and bloody on December 22nd, just before Christmas.

He had been “stoned” with rocks by 3 foster brothers while the foster parent watched but did not stop the incident from happening.

The child went unconscious.

The foster parents did not get the child medical attention.

When asked about the incident, the CPS worker said “I have no idea, I just transport the children…”

This was to make-up a visit canceled the day before in an attempt by Collin County Childrens’ Advocacy Center, to hide the child’s injuries.

On the prior day, the foster parents had falsely told the child that his mother did not show up for the visit. Meanwhile, the CPS worker falsely told the mother the foster parents ‘forgot’ to bring him.

Only after throwing a fit did they allow this make-up visit, which gave the mother an opportunity to find out the truth.

The child and his mother were only allowed to see each other

only one more time after the mother recorded the child’s injuries.

The child arrived overdosed on improper medications they “forgot” the child was not supposed to take, according to what the child told his mother. His hands were frozen in a seizure like position, and his body shook uncontrollably.

He arrived at the visit carrying a realistic gun in his pocket, a toy the foster children were given and taught how to shoot guns in target practice (while taking these improper medications). At the time this child was only 8 years old.

The following visit took place December 2004 at a Texas CPS Children’s Advocacy Center between an 8 year old child and his mother.

This child’s case was ruled out for physical abuse at his natural home, but the same cannot be said for his foster home.

He had been removed and placed in foster care where he was…actually… abused…

Upon questioning throughout this visit, the mother learns that the child had been told by the foster family that he didn’t go to the visit the day before because the mother did not show up. That simply was not true. The foster family “forgetting to bring him” wasn’t true either.

Were they trying to cover up his injuries…..?

The child was, after this visit, removed from that home, and placed in kinship care, however, the mother only saw her child one more time after this visit….

Ruled out for physical abuse at home, taken and placed in state’s care to be abused… and then his injuries attempted to be covered up…

child protective services …? protecting who?

Its been nearly 3 years since this incident occured. Case has been closed for some time now, but nobody was ever held accountable for the abuse against this child, nor to the family for the suffering it caused. The mother has not seen the child in over 2 years, and remember – no abuse had occurred – ruled out – the CPS administrative review sustained a finding that the mother had a history of a drug use and was uncooperative with a non-conforming attitude towards the system; but no injuries to the child.

In fact, the caseworker herself states that the mother interacts appropriately with the child, that the case is not so much a case of child abuse, but rather an ongoing custody battle.

In the child’s interview with the social worker the child specifically states that he is not abused, unhappy, harmed, afraid, or otherwise feels in danger with his mom.

2 years since she’s seen him.

Now its time for the truth.


Click here to listen to the audio recording as you read the transcripts below.

(more…)

child welfare reform, foster care abuse, collin county, cps, custody, divorce, false allegations, family, foster care, government, home, judicial system, kidnapping, law, missing child, sexual offenders, system failure, texas
Collin County Texas – Still taking kids from the innocent..

North Texas Man Fighting For Custody Of His Kids

DALLAS (CBS 11 News) ― A North Texas man has been found not guilty of the aggravated sexual assault of a child. Now, he and his wife are fighting to get their children back.

Douglas Buchar was a successful custom homebuilder when he received a phone call two years ago, almost to the day. Child Protective Services called to inform him that they had taken away his kids. “My secretary got a phone call at the office and said, ‘You need to take this, it’s CPS,'” Buchar recalled. “And I got on the phone and it was just like, what? And they said they took all our kids.”

The children, 4-year-old Megan and 11-year-old Justin, were picked up at school and placed in foster care on January 20, 2006. This all came after the couple’s 12-year-old adopted child accused Buchar of sexual assault.

“I couldn’t,” Buchar started, “the whole thing didn’t make no sense. It wasn’t logical, the charges they had. It just couldn’t have happened.”

Over the next two years, the couple lost their business, their house and their children.

Buchar’s wife, Joy, was arrested as well, but the charges were later dropped. “It’s like someone just took all my guts out,” she said.

The kids lived in foster care for a year and a half. Six months ago, they were given permission to live with Buchar’s sister in New York.

Earlier this week, Buchar faced his accuser during the criminal trial. “Looking at her in court and what not, it was just, she had no clue of the repercussions she has done,” he said. “She doesn’t realize what she has caused, nor do I think she really cares what she has caused. Yes, we do feel sorry for her.”

But most of all, the Buchars said that they miss their biological children.

On Wednesday, a Collin County jury found Buchar not guilty of the crime.

“One thing I learned from all this,” Buchar said, “I was a workaholic and I was working six, seven days a week, 12, 13, 14 hours a day, and I learned now. I promised Justin I’d go fishing with him so many times before. Everytime, it would be like, oh, something’s come up. I got to go. That’s all changed now. I’m going to definitely have weekends off, and definitely spend time with him.”

The Buchars have terminated their parental rights to the adopted girl.

Kelly Davis is Buchar’s lawyer who is trying to get the couple’s biological children back home. She said that she never doubted their innocence. “I think that Doug was able to prove to everybody else that he was innocent by performing all the different types of polygraph and tests that they required, and performing in order to prove his innocence.”

Although Buchar was found not guilty, the nightmare continues. The couple said that they will not stop until they can bring Justin and Megan back home.

(© MMVIII, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, divorce, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, government, healing, missing child, system failure
FLORIDA Child Protection Agency spokesman faces child-porn charges

Article published Feb 5, 2008
DCF to review personnel records
Agency spokesman faces child-porn charges
The head of the Department of Children and Families, “horrified and shocked” by the arrest of his agency spokesman on child-pornography charges, Monday ordered a review of personnel records for all DCF employees.

DCF Secretary Bob Butterworth and Florida Department of Law Enforcement Commissioner Gerald Bailey briefed reporters at DCF headquarters about the arrest of Al Zimmerman on eight counts of soliciting two boys for sexual purposes.

Butterworth, who fired Zimmerman last Friday, said he sent a message to all department employees — urging them to “work with your heads held high” — and said the incident does not reflect on DCF’s work in protecting children in foster care, the elderly and other needy Floridians.

“There are certain things you can’t prepare for. I guarantee you, this is one thing I never expected to occur,” he said. “It is one person who committed, I believe, a horrific act — a horrific act — and therefore not only victimized his victims, but victimized this department, the media and the 13,500 people who work here.”

Butterworth and Bailey said one of the two teenage boys in the Zimmerman case had been in DCF care. Bailey said “there were indications” that Zimmerman might have met a boy through agency services, but both men declined to go into details for fear of giving any information that might identify one of the victims even by inference.

Butterworth said Zimmerman had no access to DCF computer systems.

Bailey, representing Attorney General Bill McCollum at the briefing, said the FBI has seized Zimmerman’s office and home computers, to see if he distributed any child pornography. Bailey said “there are indications that at least one victim was met through his job” but that Zimmerman’s access to DCF records “was limited.”

“I know of two victims at this point. There may be others,” said Bailey. “That’s what the continuing investigation will confirm or deny.”

He credited the Tampa Police Department, FBI and McCollum’s office for working with FDLE in the case. Bailey also said DCF gave “complete and open cooperation.”

Butterworth said the DCF personnel staff will first check records of all employees hired under the new policy to make sure required background checks and fingerprints are on file. Then they will check everyone else.

“After we do all those after 2006, November, we will go backwards and hand-go-through each and every file of the 13,500 employees to make sure that everything there is also there as required by policy,” he said. “I want to make sure that our policies are being followed in all cases. I want to make sure the background check is there in the file.”

Butterworth said DCF policies before November of 2006 did not require fingerprinting of employees. Zimmerman, a former TV newsman in the Tampa Bay area, was hired in 2005 and Butterworth said that although he had “glowing endorsements” from two references — public-information aides for a police agency and a fire department — none of his former employers was contacted.

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, family, foster care, foster parent, government, law, legal, missing child, murder, system failure
Caseworkers changed, destroyed records in starvation case

 

Documents: Counties changed, destroyed records in starvation case

(AP)

Caseworkers from two neighboring counties and a state agency doctored or destroyed records pertaining to a 4-year-old girl whose starved body was found stuffed into a picnic cooler, according to a newspaper’s review of court documents.

One caseworker testified in a pretrial deposition that her supervisor ordered her to burn records pertaining to the girl, Kristen Tatar.

“And make sure that you sit down with a glass of wine and a box of Kleenex when you burn Kristen’s” records, Penn State Cooperative Extension worker Pam Walmsley testified in a deposition detailing her supervisor’s instructions. “And get it out of your system and move on.”

Tatar’s 11 1/2-pound body was found stuffed into the cooler that had been set on a curb for trash pickup behind her Armstrong County home in August 2003. Her parents, James Tatar and Janet Crawford, are serving life sentences for starving her to death.

Criminal investigators determined the couple grossly underfed the girl, who was often tied to a chair with a pacifier in her mouth and rarely bathed or nurtured.

The horrific details of Tatar’s life and death are scheduled to receive a second, more detailed airing in April when a federal judge in Pittsburgh hears a wrongful death lawsuit brought by the girl’s aunt, Cathy Fondrk. Fondrk, of Hyde Park, has adopted Kristen’s surviving brother and sued her parents and various child welfare agencies on behalf of the boy.

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review on Wednesday reported that documents filed in the case reveal that Armstrong County officials admitted that they added details to Kristen’s case file after police found her body.

But Armstrong County officials are convinced that Westmoreland County officials also doctored records. Armstrong County has hired a chemist who will testify that dates and signatures on various forms don’t match, based on his analysis of the ink used.

A key issue in the case is whether Westmoreland officials should have warned Armstrong County that the girl was at “high” risk for abuse, not “moderate” or “low” as various Westmoreland records reflected.

Fondrk sued caseworkers and officials in Armstrong County, where the girl died; the Westmoreland Children’s Bureau and some of its caseworkers who supervised Kristen case before her parents moved to Armstrong County in 2001; and the Penn State Cooperative Extension, whose employees helped Westmoreland County supervise the Tatar case.

Westmoreland County officials got a judge to declare the girl dependent and in county custody due to neglect, and twice placed her in foster care in 1999 and 2000.

Generally, the Armstrong County defendants contend Westmoreland County never relinquished jurisdiction in the case, even after Kristen’s parents moved with her to Armstrong County. Westmoreland defendants have argued in court papers that they did the best they could to supervise the girl, but were not ultimately responsible for her death in another county because Armstrong County caseworkers had begun supervising the case by then.

The state Department of Welfare in 2003 found that Westmoreland caseworkers failed to monitor whether Kristen was getting adequate medical attention and that “lax supervision” and “infrequency” of caseworker visits led to the girl’s death.

___

Information from: Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, http://pghtrib.com

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, General, government, healing, missing child, system failure
Register Your Case Against the Department of Social and Health Services
A lawsuit has been filed and is seeking class action status against the department alleging violations of constitutional rights. Nine Latina child care workers claim the state came into their homes and seized personal records in search of ‘phantom children’. The lawsuit also alleges discrimination against child care workers on the basis of ethnicity and language.

Register your Department of Social and Health Services Case

If you feel you qualify for damages or remedies that might be awarded in a possible class action or lawsuit, please click the link below to submit your complaint. By submitting this form, you are asking lawyers to contact you. You are under no obligation to accept their services. Lawyers are usually paid out of the proceeds of the settlement or verdict rendered.

Please click here for a free evaluation of your case
Columbia Legal Services – Joe Morrison
(Source: LawyersandSettlements.com)

“Its ALmost Tuesday” and its blogowner  is merely providing you with a link to register your Department of Social and Health Services case; we make no promises, form no opinions as to how your case may be evaluated; and we are not lawyers nor giving legal advice.
domestic violence, family, foster care, foster parent, healing, law, legal, missing child, murder, system failure
Schaefer: Trial by jury needed to remove child

Sunday, December 2, 2007
Last modified Thursday, November 29, 2007 9:03 AM EST

Schaefer: Trial by jury needed to remove child
By Tom Law

Source: The Toccoa Record

State Sen. Nancy Schaefer last week called for an overhaul of the state’s child protection services provided through the Department of Family and Children’s Services (DFCS).

Among the recommendations by Schaefer, who represents the 50th District which includes Stephens County, was that a jury trial be held when a child is taken from their parents.

Schaefer also called for the requirement of a warrant signed by a judge before removing a child from their parents, except in an emergency situation such as a medical crisis.

“The Department of Family and Children’s Service, known as the Department of Child Protective Services in other states, has become a protected empire built on taking children and separating families,”

Schaefer said in a lengthy e-mail…

“This is not to say there are not children who do need to be removed from wretched situations and need protection,”

Schaefer said.

“This report is concerned with the children and parents caught in legal kidnapping, ineffective policies and DFCS that does not remove a child or children when a child is enduring torment and abuse.”

Schaefer offered as an example an unnamed county in her district where she met with 37 families to discuss the “gestapo” tactics of the DFCS.

“I witnessed the deceitful conditions under which children were taken in the middle of the night, out of hospitals and off school busses,”

Schaefer said.

“Having worked with probably 300 cases statewide, I am convinced there is no responsibility and no accountability in the system.”

Among Schaefer’s conclusions:

  • Poor parents are targeted to lose their children because they do not have the wherewithal to hire lawyers and fight the system.

“Being poor does not mean you are not a good parent or that you do not love your child or that your child should be removed and placed with strangers,”

Schaefer said.

  • All parents are capable of making mistakes and that making a mistake does not mean children should be removed from the home.
  • Parenting classes, anger management classes, counseling referrals, therapy classes, etc. are demanded of parents with no compassion by the system while they are at work and while their children are separated from them.
  • Caseworkers and social workers are often guilty of fraud.
  • “They withhold evidence. They fabricate evidence and they seek to terminate parental rights. However, when charges are made against them, the charges are ignored,” Schaefer said.
  • Separation of families is a growing business because local governments have grown accustomed to having taxpayer dollars to balance their ever-expanding budgets.
  • DFCS and juvenile court can always hide behind a confidentiality clause in order to protect their decisions.
  • There are no financial resources and no real drive to unite a family and help keep them together.
  • The incentive for social workers to return children to their parents quickly after taking them has disappeared.
  • The policy manual for DFCS is considered the last word.“The manual is too long, too confusing, poorly written and doesn’t take the law into consideration,” Schaefer said.
  • Children removed from homes may not be safer in foster care.“Children of whom I am aware have been raped and impregnated in foster care and the head of a foster parents association in my district was recently arrested because of child molestation,” Schaefer said.
  • Grandparents are not often contacted by DFCS when children are removed from homes.“Grandparents who lose their grandchildren to strangers have lost their own flesh and blood. The children lose their family heritage, and grandparents lose all connections to their heirs,” Schaefer said.Schaefer is calling for an independent audit of DFCS to expose possible “corruption and fraud.”She also called for immediate change. “Every day that passes means more families and children are subject to being held hostage.”Schaefer said any financial incentives to separate families should end, and parents should be given their rights in writing.She also called for a required search for family members to be given the opportunity to adopt their own relatives, and when someone fabricates or presents false evidence, a hearing should be held with the right to discovery of all evidence.
  • child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, family, foster care, government, missing child, system failure
    Failure to Protect – A look at CPS and the System

    I’ve added a new page,

    Failure to Protect – Caseworker Files.

    Go check it out and the source:

    PBS’s Frontline series about CPS and our families/system.

    The information and stories are indescribable
    and full of information everyone needs to know.
    I’d love your comments on it, and if you’ve been
    affected by CPS and the system, please tell us your story.
    Everyone deserves to be heard.
    “We see them in special education.
    We see them in the justice system.
    We see them in the prison system.
    We see them as parents,
    where now we’re asking them about taking away their children.
    So at some point, this country has got to come to grips,
    where the rhetoric about our children
    and the resources to carry out that rhetoric have
    got to be matched. And there is not so far demonstrated
    in this country that the political will is there to do that.”
    “The whole system is a way of dealing with poverty,
    especially with poor minority families. And maybe if
    we admit it, we would be more willing to take those
    billions and billions and billions of dollars spent
    on keeping children away from their families,
    on providing support for children and families to
    begin with, so that they wouldn’t have to end up
    in a system like this.”