Tag: social services

cps
The Comptroller’s Health Care Claims Study – Drugging Foster Children

(CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD & LISTEN TO A FOSTER CHILD DESCRIBE, TO HIS MOTHER, THE EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC MEDICATIONS HE WAS GIVEN IN FOSTER CARE BY MISTAKE IN COLLIN COUNTY TEXAS.)

Its Almost Tuesday is determined to keep thE  PROBLEM OF CPS DRUGGING FOSTER CHILDREN alive AND TALKED ABOUT!

IN THAT REGARD, please READ & share THE IMPORTANT INFORMATION  IN THIS ARTICLE with others & demand accountability FROM OUR GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS!

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Special Report of Foster Children has revealed many failures and tragedies – by connecting the dots between the state’s foster children and their Medicaid medical and prescription drug claims. The picture is bleak, and rooted in profound human suffering. It represents nothing less than a failure of the entire Texas foster care system.

Voluntary medication parameters and guidelines have been created and the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and its allied agencies have issued a request for proposals (RFP) “to contract with a single Managed Care Organization (MCO) to develop a statewide Comprehensive Health Care Model for Foster Care.” But much more needs to be done. (See Appendix I for a history of psychotropic medications and foster children and Appendix III for a comparison of fiscal 2004 and 2005 foster care psychotropic prescriptions.)

The complex nature of the foster care system generates many opportunities for fi ngerpointing, but ultimately the responsibility must lie at the top, with the government agencies that allowed this situation to develop.

While not all foster care providers provide optimum care and treatment, HHSC and the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) must be held accountable. They place the children and monitor them—or fail to—and they pay the medical bills.

One of the biggest differences between foster children and other children is that foster children often do not have an active and engaged guardian or caregiver in their lives like other children.

While DFPS has a policy that requires foster care caseworkers to visit children on their caseloads at least once a month and visit them at their places of residence at least every three months – in reality this does not always happen. Caseworkers rely on foster care providers or foster parents to ensure that children in their daily care are doing well and following their treatment regiment. In many cases this system works well and foster children receive the service they need.

However, because the foster care population moves from place to place with frequency there is often no single person on a daily basis that watches out for the well being of the child. In addition, many foster children have very complex emotional and physical needs.

Foster children are often prescribed numerous psychotropic medications.

These powerful medications sometimes carry warnings from the U. S. Food and Drug Administration regarding their adverse effects that can be serious or even life threatening. Some foster children receive combinations of psychotropic medications, which can then create other side effects. Foster parents often do not have the training or expertise to be able to monitor these children.

Most children have biological parents or guardians, who know exactly what types of medical treatments, prescriptions, etc. their children have had. In fact, most biological parents or guardians know who their children’s doctors are and how to reach them. However, in many instances foster care providers do not know a child’s medical history or physician because they have not received any of the child’s medical records.

In addition, foster care providers don’t normally know right away what to expect from a foster child, and in many cases do not have a chance to care for children for prolonged periods of time because they are moved so frequently. (As documented in the Comptroller’s Forgotten Children report.)

To analyze the extensive amount of Medicaid prescription data, the Comptroller called on two internationally recognized and extensively published experts: Julie Magno Zito, Ph.D., a professor of pharmacy at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; and Dr. Daniel J. Safer, a psychiatrist and professor at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

These authorities guided the review team in examining and understanding these records, and in making recommendations for improved care.

This external review produced a number of key findings:

Key Points of The Zito/Safer External Review include:

• Most prescribed psychotropic medications for foster children are “off-label”, which means they are not FDA approved for this population or for a particular indication. Consequently, pertinent safety and efficacy information on medications is very limited for this age group.

Increasing the number of concomitant medications increases the risks of adverse drug events.

Random assignment, evidence-based, controlled, clinical trial data on psychotropic medications prescribed concomitantly for youth are essentially non-existent.

MEDICAL CONCERNS

This report reveals a number of significant medical concerns within the state’s foster care system.

LACK OF MEDICAL HISTORIES

DFPS still does not provide its foster children with a “medical passport” explaining their medical history, including diagnoses and prescriptions although the passport is required by law.

Instead, foster children often move from one placement to another, seeing new physicians or counselors who have little or no knowledge of their past medical histories. A medical passport would help provide more consistent care for these children.

In September 2006, DFPS stated that it “is working with HHSC on the development of the health passport, scheduled to be implemented September 2007”— more than three years after the Comptroller’s first published recommendation. Psychiatric Hospitalizations DFPS has no rules, guidelines or monitoring procedures concerning the psychiatric hospitalization of foster children.

In fiscal 2004, 1,663 Texas foster children were hospitalized for psychiatric care for a total of 33,712 days, at a cost of $16 million based on daily rates of more than $500 per day.

DFPS has no rules, guidelines or monitoring procedures concerning the psychiatric hospitalization of foster children.

More than 400 foster children spent than a month each in psychiatric facilities in fiscal 2004.

Some of these foster children were “dumped” into psychiatric hospitals, by foster parents who decided that they could not deal with the child’s behavior.

DFPS caseworkers often left foster children in such facilities long after they were authorized for release.

Medically Fragile Children

The Comptroller’s office estimates that about 1,600 “medically fragile” children were in Texas foster care in fiscal 2004. These children have serious and continuing medical conditions requiring specialized care and treatment. About 49 percent of them were four years old or younger.

Many of these children were in “basic” service-level homes, because DFPS places more emphasis on behavioral conditions than on physical conditions and needs.

HIV and AIDS

DFPS has been particularly negligent in caring for foster children with fatal and incurable human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). These children are not receiving consistent care and counseling.

Some have been enrolled in clinical trials and did not have advocates appointed for them.

  • At least one foster facility that cared primarily for children with HIV and AIDS was closed due to poor living conditions and substandard care.
  • Twenty-six Texas foster children received at least one HIV medication and had at least one outpatient HIV procedure in fiscal 2004.
  • More than 15 had at least one outpatient procedure with an HIV-related diagnosis code, but did not receive any HIV medications—a peculiar and disturbing pattern.

Many of these children were categorized at the lowest, basic service level.

In fiscal 2004, 63 foster children were raped while in care; of these, only 16 received HIV tests.

Meaning that 75 percent of those raped were not tested for HIV following the rape, as required by law.

One foster child with HIV who was also medically fragile had more than 600 outpatient claims and more than 200 prescription drug claims in fiscal 2004.

This child lived in rural Texas, in a 1,300 square-foot mobile home with four other foster children, one of whom also was medically fragile. A review of the DFPS records indicated that this small home was not licensed to care for more than four children.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Some Texas foster children are suffering from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Many are sexually active or were sexually abused while in care, while others come into care with the disease. In fiscal 2004, more than 200 foster children were diagnosed with STDs.

Most of them were teenagers between the ages of 15 and 19. DFPS should recognize this problem and actively address it through education, testing and appropriate treatment.

The review team found irregularities in prescribing practices and counseling delivered to foster children with STDs; females in foster care were six times more likely to be diagnosed with a STD than males.

Pregnant Foster Children

In fiscal 2004, 142 foster children delivered babies.

The DFPS guidelines regarding birth control, pregnancy and abortion are vague and are not given to providers and foster parents.

Some pregnant foster teens received powerful psychotropic medications that are not recommended for use in pregnant women.

And many were moved repeatedly throughout their pregnancies, because many residential treatment centers and foster homes will not take them.

Texas has few specialty maternity homes that can offer services to these teens. Foster teens and their new babies, moreover, often were not placed in the same home in a timely manner following their discharge from the hospital.

Contraceptives and Foster Children

In fiscal 2004, Medicaid spent $176,814 on more than 4,300 birth control prescriptions for more than a thousand Texas foster children.

Medical claims for these children suggest that not all sexually active foster children receiving these medications were given their recommended yearly gynecology examinations.

A 15-year-old mentally retarded foster child received eight different prescriptions for birth control pills in fiscal 2004, but had no claims for a gynecological examination.

And, a 17-year-old foster child received six different prescriptions for birth control patches in fiscal 2004, but had no claims for a pap smear or gynecological exam. This child was diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease early in fiscal 2004.

Injuries and Deaths

In fiscal 2004, 46 Texas foster children died while in care.

DFPS determined that five of these deaths resulted from abuse and neglect, but 15 cases were left “open” and abuse and neglect were not ruled out.

HOW MANY DEATHS OCCURRED THAT SAME YEAR BY ABUSE AND NEGLECT FROM NATURAL PARENTS IN TEXAS? JUST CURIOUS – IF ANYONE HAS THAT DATA?

Many other foster children were taken to emergency rooms or hospitals with very severe injuries and medical conditions.

Medicinal Poisonings

More than 150 foster children were poisoned by medication in fiscal 2004, and not all of these cases were investigated by DFPS.

Some foster children remained in the same foster homes after they survived the poisoning.

DFPS and HHSC should ensure that every poisoning from medication is investigated.

The DFPS hotline received a report that a nine-year-old child was being overmedicated, but the agency did not investigate the case.

Foster Children and Clinical Trials.

It was revealed in May 2005 that HIV positive Texas foster children had been enrolled in experimental clinical drug trials.

This news sparked nationwide coverage of the topic, since the children were being exposed to potentially serious and even lethal side effects of the trial drugs.

Because of the confidential nature of clinical trials, it is not possible to find out details regarding Texas foster children enrolled in such studies, but some questionable indicators were uncovered – such as medications were billed with no record of medication payment and foster children that are HIV positive with no Medicaid billings for medications.

Section 6544 of the DFPS Handbook states:

…no HIV infected child in DFPS conservatorship may participate in any experimental drug therapy… unless the child or child’s caregiver first secures the written approval of the child’s physician or program director of the child’s conservatorship unit.

The review team asked DFPS:

How many foster children participated in any experimental drug therapy or clinical trials from fiscal 2004 to 2006, and how such participation is reported or tracked and if there is detail by disease or condition?

The agency responded as follows:

There are currently no clinical trials for HIV, so no children in foster care were enrolled in this type of trial between FY 2004 and FY 2006. A few children in foster care may be enrolled in other clinical trials.

This response is vague and it is clear DFPS either does not know how many foster children are in clinical trials—or chooses not to tell.

(NOTE: THEY CHOOSE NOT TO TELL.)

According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health website in September 2006, there were 1,928 clinical trials under way in Texas, including several related to HIV.

Executive Summary &

Systemic Recommendations

More than 150 foster children were poisoned by medication in fiscal 2004, and not all of these cases were investigated by DFPS.

The Medications

In fiscal 2004, Texas Medicaid spent $30 million for powerful, expensive psychotropic prescriptions for Texas foster children. Many of these children received multiple medications. Psychotropic medications can have very serious side-effects and their use should be strictly monitored; a large number of them are not approved for use in children or adolescents.

The review team found that Texas foster children receive more psychotropic medications than their counterparts in mid- Atlantic and Midwestern states.

DSHS has set voluntary parameters for the use of psychotropics by foster children. These guidelines were released in February 2005 and were supposed to be revised annually. A committee met in August 2006 to discuss the revision; the first revised parameters were scheduled for release in October 2006.

Key concerns identified by this review include:

  • Costly Psychotropic Medications In fiscal 2004, psychotropic drugs accounted for more than 76 percent of the cost of all medications prescribed to foster children, which totaled $39 million for all medications.
  • All other drug categories, including a wide variety of drugs from antibiotics to cancer medications, accounted for just over 23 percent of the total or $9.2 million.
  • Of all drugs prescribed to children in foster care, three psychotropic drug classes, antidepressants, antipsychotics and stimulants— were the most frequently prescribed.
  • In fiscal 2004, Texas Medicaid spent more money on antipsychotic drugs for foster children, more than $14.9 million or 38 percent of the total, than on any other class of drugs.
  • The average cost per prescription for psychotropic drugs was $114.69. The average for all other drugs, by contrast, was $52.17 per prescription.
  • Antipsychotics: In fiscal 2004, Texas Medicaid spent nearly $15 million on 65,469 anti-psychotic prescriptions for Texas foster children.

NOTE: BIG PROFIT FOR DRUG COMPANIES

CPS takes children from homes, usually on unsubstantiated referrals of abuse or neglect.  They drug the children, test drugs that are not FDA approved, bill the state-funded (tax payers) Medicaid Program, offer kickbacks to pharmaceutical companies & doctors, and funnel the funds amongst themselves at the expense of families and children. – MILLION AND MILLIONS OF DOLLARS.  

WHEN THE OFFICIALS GET CAUGHT FOR MEDICAID FRAUD, the Texas Government  REFUNDS THE MONEY BACK TO MEDICAID

– but cannot prosecute anyone for the Medicaid Fraud because of a COMPUTER GLITCH THAT DESTROYED THE EVIDENCE NECESSARY TO PROSECUTE ANYONE!

What about the foster children who were drugged? What about the trauma induced in the parents who saw their children drugged at visits?

What has been done for these children? NOTHING.

Can Governor Rick Perry tell the children and their parents what will be done to compensate them for their ruined lives?

These very powerful and expensive medications were prescribed despite a lack of studies demonstrating their safety and efficacy in children.

There are questions regarding the long-term safety of these medications; documented serious side-effects include menstrual irregularities, gynecomastia, galactorrhea, possible pituitary tumors, hyperglycemia, type 2 diabetes and liver function abnormalities.

Close monitoring of these medications by physicians is essential; Texas foster children are not receiving this attention.

In addition, more than 400 foster children were prescribed antidyskinetics drugs to control side effects from antipsychotics.

Side effects from antipsychotics include tremors, tics, dystonia, dyskinesia and tardive dyskinesia.

Stimulant Prescription Drugs:

  • In fiscal 2004, Texas Medicaid spent $4.5 million on 45,318 stimulant prescriptions for more than 6,500 Texas foster children.

Nearly all of these medications are Schedule II controlled substances, due to their high potential for abuse and severe psychological or physical dependence.

More than a quarter of all male foster children and nearly 15 percent of female foster children received prescriptions for stimulants in fiscal 2004; nearly 200 of these children were aged four or younger.

In addition, some foster children received many questionable high-cost, high-dose prescriptions.

One prescription for a foster child was written for 360 pills of the stimulant Adderall XR 30mg—for a 30-day supply. (note : that’s 12 pills a day!!!)   Adderall XR is an extended-release medication meant to be taken only once daily. 

NOTE: WAS ANYONE ARRESTED FOR MEDICAL NEGLECT?

WHO WAS HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR POISONING THAT CHILD?? 

WHAT KIND OF DOCTOR OR FOSTER PARENT WOULD DISPENSE A DOSE LIKE THAT TO A CHILD?

DID THEY DISPENSE IT TO THE CHILD?

DID THEY ONLY DISPENSE THIS MEDICATION ON PAPER FOR THE PROFIT?

DID THIS CHILD OVERDOSE!!!????

 Its Almost Tuesday would like to know.

Anticonvulsants (Mood Stabilizers): accounted for more than 76 percent of the cost of all medications prescribed to foster children, which totaled $39 million for all medications. 􀃍

In fiscal 2004, Texas Medicaid spent nearly $4.8 million on nearly 43,000 mood stabilizer prescriptions for about 4,500 Texas foster children.

This included 133 children aged four and younger.

These medications are used to treat bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression; some also are also used to treat seizures and epilepsy.

NOTE: FOR A FOUR YEAR OLD OR YOUNGER???

HOW MANY FOUR YEAR OLD CHILDREN ARE BI-POLAR WITH ANXIETY DISORDERS?   

Trileptal and Topamax, which together accounted for about 38 percent of all mood stabilizer prescriptions, have no established efficacy for psychotropic use in either children or adults.

Antidepressants: In fiscal 2004, Texas foster children received more than 66,000 prescriptions for antidepressant medications, making this drug class the most commonly prescribed medication.

Antidepressant medications ranked fourth in the total cost of prescriptions for fiscal 2004, at $3.8 million.

In June 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began to investigate the use of antidepressants to treat children and adolescents.

NOTE:  BEGAN TO INVESTIGATE??

PRESCRIBED MORE THAN 66,000 ANTIDEPRESSANTS BY THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR? AND THEY CLAIM THEY WERE NOT DOING CLINICAL TRIAL STUDIES?

THEY ARE USING FOSTER CHILDREN AS GUINEA PIGS!

In October 2004, the FDA ordered drug manufacturers to place a “black box” warning on all classes of antidepressants stating that they may increase the risk of suicidal behavior in children and adolescents.

NOTE: I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW MANY CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE COMMITTED OR ATTEMPTED SUICIDE AND WERE ON ANTI-DEPRESSANTS?

Anxiolytics (Anti-anxiety): In fiscal 2004, 688 foster children received 3,113 anti-anxiety prescriptions.

The largest subclass of these drugs, and the most widely prescribed, are the benzodiazepines.

NOTE: ONE OF THE LEGALLY PRESCRIBED DRUGS I WAS TAKING AND THE SAME CPS USED AS ONE OF THE REASONS FOR REMOVING MY CHILD INTO FOSTER CARE – WHERE THEY THEN PRESCRIBE THE SAME MEDICATIONS…?

These drugs have been used with success to treat anxiety, but their use is limited because they have sedating side effects and may be habit-forming when taken for a long time or in high doses.

Anxiolytics are regulated under Schedule IV, by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Hypnotic/Sedatives: In fiscal 2004, Medicaid spent more than $72,000 on nearly 2,500 hypnotic/sedative prescriptions for about 1,000 Texas foster children, including 232 children aged four and younger.

These medications are used to treat anxiety or sleep disorders. They can cause dependency in just a few days and tolerance in a few weeks.

Psychotropic Use by the Very Young

In fiscal 2004, 686 foster children aged four and under received more than 4,500 prescriptions for psychotropic medications,

NOTE: THATS AN AVERAGE OF 7 PRESCRIPTIONS PER CHILD UNDER THE AGE OF FOUR the majority of which are not approved by the FDA for use in children.

A two year-old foster child with no diagnoses indicating psychosis received seven prescriptions for Risperdal, a powerful antipsychotic, totaling more than $700.

NOTE: TWO YEARS OLD –  AND THESE PEOPLE ARE NOT JAILED, ARRESTED, OR HUNG ON A STAKE???

A TWO YEAR OLD BABY!!!???

Controlled Substances

In fiscal 2004, Medicaid spent $4.6 million on more than 53,000 prescriptions for controlled substances for more than 9,600 Texas foster children.  

NOTE: HOW MANY OF THESE VERY SAME FOSTER CHILDREN WERE REMOVED FROM THEIR HOMES FOR PARENTS HAVING SUBSTANCE ABUSE ISSUES? 

FURTHER – HOW MANY OF THOSE CHILDREN REMOVED FOR PARENTS HAVING SUBSTANCE ABUSE ISSUES DID NOT INCUR INJURIES OR ABUSE BUT WERE MERELY REMOVED DUE TO THE S.A.  ISSUES?

HOW MANY OF THOSE CHILDREN WERE THEN GIVEN CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES IN FOSTER CARE?

HOW MANY OF THOSE FOSTER CHILDREN WILL BECOME DRUG ADDICTS THEMSELVES AS A RESULT OF CPS FOSTER CARE DRUGGING THEM?

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has placed these substances on the controlled substances list because of their high potential for abuse.

More than 2,300 Texas foster children, including 871 children age four and younger, received more than 3,200 prescriptions for addictive narcotic syrups.

A total of 177 foster children received more than 1,100 prescriptions for phenobarbital.

NOTE: READ ABOUT PHENOBARBITAL ON WIKIPEDIA HERE

Long-term Risks and Polypharmacy

The Zito & Safer External Review notes that the widespread use of antipsychotics in children and adolescents raises particular concerns regarding long-term safety.

Serious questions exist regarding this issue, which involves documented, side effects.

Little is known about the long-term effects of early and prolonged exposure to psychotropic medications on the development of children’s brains.

These findings underline the importance of further research to determine the safety and efficacy of pediatric psychotropic drugs and polypharmacy.

The use of psychotropics in the Texas Medicaid population of children and adolescents tripled from 1996 to 2000.

A 2004 Texas study by the HHSC’s Office of the Inspector General revealed that foster children receive more psychotropic drugs on average than other Texas Medicaid children.

Psychotropic use by Texas pre-school-aged foster children was three times higher than among similar foster children in the Mid-Atlantic states. Instances of “polypharmacy,” the prescription of two or more psychotropics for one person—has increased rapidly as well.

Complex psychotropic drug therapy tends to result in ever-increasing combinations that tend to increase in continuously enrolled populations and present risks for long-term safety in developing youth.

Off -label Usage

Most psychotropic medications have not been studied extensively for efficacy and safety in children.

The National Institutes of Mental Health notes that about 80 percent of psychotropic drugs are not approved for use in children or adolescents.

Their use in this population is described as “off-label.” Yet the off-label use of these drugs in children is common.

Efficacy Questions

Many medications prescribed to Texas foster children have been shown to have no or minimal efficacy. Among antidepressants, for instance, FDA findings from clinical trials showed little or no efficacy from the use of escitaloram (Lexapro), paroxetine (Paxil) and venlafaxine (Effexor).

Yet prescription patterns among foster children appears to ignore such findings from clinical trials that show a lack of or minimal efficacy.

In fiscal 2004, Texas foster children received the following:

escitaloram (Lexapro): nearly 12,000 prescriptions totaling $763,000.

paroxetine (Paxil): more than 550 prescriptions totaling almost $50,000.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/AWr1GK7w1uE]

venlafaxine (Effexor): about 3,000 prescriptions totaling more than $300,000.

NOTE: EFFEXOR.COM STATES: 

Suicidality and Antidepressant Drugs Antidepressants increased the risk compared to placebo of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, teens, and young adults.

Depression and certain other psychiatric disorders are themselves associated with increases in the risk of suicide.

Patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. 

EFFEXOR XR®(venlafaxine HCl) is not approved for use in children and teens.

Many anticonvulsant drugs are being used as mood stabilizers for Texas foster children, including oxcarbazepine and topirimate.

These drugs have been found to be ineffective for psychiatric purposes.

Nevertheless, they were widely prescribed to Texas foster children in fi scal 2004:

oxcarbazepine (Trileptal): nearly 13,000 prescriptions totaling $1.98 million.

topiramate (Topamax): more than 3,300 prescriptions totaling more than $500,000. Compound Drugs In fiscal 2004, 572 foster children received nearly 2,000 prescriptions for compound drugs.

The FDA is concerned that such drugs carry a risk of contamination and the efficacy and potency can be effected. Fraud and abuse can also be a factor in compound drug prescriptions.

Recommendations to improve the Texas Foster Care system that should be implemented immediately:

1. The Health and Human Services Commission, Office of Inspector General should fully investigate areas of concern and cases of interest identifi ed in this report.

2. DFPS should hire a full-time physician to serve as its medical director, to oversee the care, treatment and medications provided to Texas foster children. The medical director should evaluate medical care provided to foster children and report the results to the DSHS and HHSC annually. The medical director should establish an analysis team to assist with the evaluation. The team should consist of psychopharmacologists and child and adolescent psychiatrists from medical schools.

3. The newly created DFPS medical director should be responsible for ensuring that all foster care parents and facilities receive “medical passport” information within 48 hours of the foster child’s placement. The “passport” should be updated consistently and should document all medical treatments, prescriptions, psychological diagnoses and counseling to provide continuity of care.

4. DSHS should review this report and begin implementing its recommendations as soon as possible, including those from the external review by Zito/Safer.

5. DFPS, in coordination with DSHS and HHSC, should examine the best practices of successful foster care providers to develop and implement means to reduce the system’s reliance on psychotropic medications to treat foster children.

6. DFPS should establish strict rules regarding participation by foster children in any type of clinical trial. In addition, DFPS should track and monitor all foster children who are enrolled in clinical trials. All foster parents and providers should be made aware of the rules and the potential risks of clinical trials. Additional recommendations more specific to each problem are made in later chapters in this report.

Counseling

Some foster children receive counseling services, but not all do, and others do not receive consistent counseling.

According to the American Counseling Association, “Professional counselors help clients identify goals and potential solutions to problems which cause emotional turmoil; seek to improve communication and coping skills; strengthen self-esteem; and promote behavior change and optimal mental health. Counseling is a technique that can be used by individuals coping with a mental illness, recovering from a trauma, managing stress, or dealing with family issues.”

While some foster children suffer from severe mental illness, others have milder problems. The various options described below may help to reduce the number of psychotropic prescriptions prescribed to Texas foster children. Innovative Therapeutic Provider One Texas therapeutic foster care provider consciously uses a different approach to treat very troubled foster children, most of whom are classified by service level as specialized.

This facility employs intensive therapeutic intervention that focuses on teaching children appropriate ways to problem-solve and make healthy and positive choices in their lives.

In an interview regarding the usage of psychotropic medications, a staff member stated that children at this facility are held accountable for their actions and are taught to manage their behavior with as few psychotropic medications as possible.

HE (A STAFF MEMBER) ALSO SAID THAT SOME CHILDREN COME INTO THEIR PROGRAM SO HEAVILY MEDICATED THAT THEY ARE “DROOLING.’

An innovative therapeutic foster care provider has been successful in lowering the number of psychotropic medications given to foster children in its care.

Not all foster children who need counseling are receiving it on a regular basis. •

DFPS is not doing all it can to promote mentor-ship for foster children.

Since publication of the Comptroller’s Forgotten Children report in April 2004, the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS), the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) have been addressing psychotropic medication use by foster children.

DSHS has established medication parameters to help monitor and reduce the number of prescriptions.

Yet many psychotropic medications still are being prescribed to all ages of foster children. While medication may be beneficial in treating mental disorders, a “pill” cannot solve all of the emotional issues and problems foster children face while in care.

The Zito/Safer External Review states,

“poverty, social deprivation and unsafe environments do not necessarily require complex drug regimes.”

Often when foster children experience emotional problems they undergo psychiatric evaluations and are then taken to a physician, frequently a psychiatrist (but not always) who then prescribes one or more medications to help treat the problem.

While medication may be beneficial in treating mental disorders, a “pill” cannot solve all of the emotional issues and problems foster children face while in care.

A check of this provider’s Medicaid claims for foster children in its care showed that their usage of psychotropic medications decreased.

It is also important to analyze underlying causes that can affect mental health. Britain’s Mental Health Foundation has observed that,

“An integrated approach, recognizing the interplay of biological, psychological, social and environmental factors, is key to challenging the growing burden of mental ill-health in western nations.”2

Researchers are discovering how aspects of environment and social class can be associated with children’s poor health and behavior.3

Britain’s National Health Service has found that mental health problems are more common among people in poor living conditions, members of certain minority groups and the disabled.4

In Forgotten Children and its subsequent studies, the Comptroller’s office has found that Texas foster children often come from unhealthy living environments, and some remain in unstable and unsafe living conditions while in the foster care system. These include medically fragile children living in very small homes with many children, in mobile homes and in remote, isolated areas of the state.

Administrators at psychiatric hospitals told the review team that some children they treat have refused to return to their previous placements because they were so unhappy there.

Medical records revealed about 200 claims for scabies and multiple claims for the treatment of parasites in fiscal 2004, involving about 1,500 prescriptions at a cost of $80,000.

Scabies often is found among people living in crowded and unsanitary conditions. An unhealthy living environment can affect the mental health of already emotionally fragile children.

Alternatives to Psychotropic Medications – Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is a common treatment that can help children understand and resolve their problems and modify their behavior. It can come in many forms, including individual, family and group therapy, play therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy.5

Many foster children need therapy because they have been removed from their homes, which can be very stressful.

The Comptroller’s office has found that Texas foster children often come from unhealthy living environments, and some remain in unstable and unsafe living conditions while in the foster care system.

ITS ALMOST TUESDAY WELCOMES AND ENCOURAGES READERS’ COMMENTS ON  THE TOPIC OF THIS OUTRAGEOUS ACT OF DRUGGING FOSTER CHILDREN, DISREGARDING THEIR RIGHTS AS HUMAN BEINGS 

THE LIVES OF FOSTER CHILDREN ARE NOT DISPOSABLE

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cps, family, healing, social worker, system failure, welfare reform
When CPS Workers Confuse Poverty w/Neglect..They Live Forever…

A single mother has  fallen on hard times with the sudden departure of her husband. He has recently abandoned her and her son for a woman, his mistress from a love affair.

This mother is distraught & undoubtedly depressed.  She was caught off guard and was left without a job after having been a housewife for many years.

This mother went  from an affluent wife to a single poverty stricken mother. She does not know where to begin her new life, for she is still in shock from the ending of her old life.  She is, as any woman would be, terribly depressed at the failure of her marriage, but,  one thing she knows for certain is that  she has a son to care for.

She musters up the strength of will to keep going, however difficult it is . Some days seem impossible to do what she has to, but she finds the will to take care of her boy. They are very close, even moreso since finding themselves alone. They are partners against the world, each night saying prayers and assuring one another that times will get better, just have faith.

One day, her electric bill came due.  In her newfound budget, she had mistakenly overspent at the grocery store and the lights get shut off.

Her soon to be ex comes by to surprise her with divorce papers .  He announces that he is on his way out of town for a “new job somewhere “.  When she asks where, he won’t disclose any details and it angers him.

The former couple begin to argue and he remarks of the mother and child living  in the dark with candles lit and a fire in the fireplace.

When she insists that it is his fault for leaving them without warning, insisting on knowing where he’s moving for this job, he threatens to take her son with him if she doesn’t stop badgering.

The next day calls CPS and a social worker comes out, and finds the home without electricity, and removes the child into foster care. The father has already left town and isn’t readily found, and the mother falls apart.

The child never comes home again.

This mother is sustained on a finding of ‘neglectful supervision’ because she “should have known” better than to allow her electricity to get shut off .  The social worker stated in her report that the mother failed to apply for assistance before it came down to that and if she overlooks something like electricity, she is probably overlooking  other needs of the child’s.  These  activities could leave the child at serious risk of harm.That’s what the report said.

Truth is though, she is poor and suffering at a tragic time in their life.   That does not mean she neglects her child, she just needs a boost to start their new life.  Maybe some assistance.  It was the only time their electricity was cut off, she never considered it before because it never happened.

The CPS worker jumped to immediate conclusions, and should have helped the mother find ways to improve her situation, request assistance, apply for legal aid and get child support. There were many ways the problem was easily remedied.

However, poverty was mistaken for neglect, and defined “at risk ” when there’s never been any risk to the child, the problems begin with the definitions of abuse/neglect. Then, the problems end with the willingness to remove children being stronger than the desire to keep the child at home.

A CPS social worker who is unable to familiarize herself with this poor but loving family that needs a little boost in life, offer some counseling maybe, or a support group for divorcing women is the first problem that should be solved.

Why is she unable to do this?  Most likely its due to the tremendous caseload she has stacked in front of her… Perhaps she does not mean to overlook this family… but because she has so much to do, she inadvertently tosses this family into the black pit of a child welfare system’s worst side, needlessly removes the child from the home, and places him in foster care.

Even worse, the shortage of foster homes takes this child too far away to visit regularly because there were no other openings.  Later, he gets abused there and nobody finds out until too late and permanent injuries are suffered.  The mother has fallen apart and can’t seem to get the help she needs, so she is labeled overly emotional.  CPS puts her through psychiatric evaluations one after the other, until finally she has a breakdown when she learns of the abuse her son has gone through. They terminate her rights.

It happens all the time in this system.

All this Mother really needed was some food stamps and assistance on her light bill for a month or two. Maybe temporary financial aid for a down payment on a new car, so she could get some job training and go back to work. Perhaps some temporary medical care to get them both back healthy again, with a flu shot, and some counseling over her divorce. and his loss of a father figure.

Instead, this mother lost her husband, then her lights, then her child, then herself, to grief.

An overzealous social worker received a spite referral from a cheating man who spent enough money on airplane drinks to pay her electric bill twice over.  Nobody tracks him down to file false allegation charges on him.

Her son no longer wants to make his Daddy proud, or thinks of  Daddy as a hero, but instead, loses his own future in drugs and alcohol.    It starts out with a beer can and a marijuana joint he smokes but eventually turns into cocaine and petty crimes in order to buy it.

The boy is a teenager in foster care.  He’s been moved so many times from home to home, facility to facility, that now, he doesn’t care anymore.  He runs away from the home often so he can do his drugs and eventually goes to jail.

Of course by then he doesn’t have anyone to call so he does time, about a year in juvenile detention.  In that year  he gets sexually abused and in fights.  A few months after being released on his 18th birthday, he gets arrested again for stealing a car.  That sentence, he gets caught up in the prison gang life and learns to hurt people, after years he spent in foster care and juvenile detention, doing a lot of fighting.  He is very angry.  It was only a light bill past due.

He is angry at his father who divorced his mother and leaving them in a shabby apartment with no lights.

He knows his father made the phone call that destroyed their life. He knows his father so cowardly ran away with another woman, and he is angry at how that hurt them.

He is angry that he lost his mother who was his best friend. He is angry that he can’t find her, and that she was taken away from him. 

He is angry that it made her fall apart, because he knows she loved him so much.

He is angry that now she is gone, and he is angry that he is behind bars, and so he fights life, and everyone in it. 

He sits and thinks about it all the time.  He thinks about the social worker who took him away from home.

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Are you a caseworker for CPS? 

Do you volunteer for CASA while you go to school?

Do you hope to be a social worker and help abused kids one day?

Do you want to be a social worker when you graduate college? 

Do you work for the advocacy center doing forensic interviews?

Is that you?

Okay, next question… do you want to live forever?

Carry on a legacy?

Make a difference in someone’s life?

Change history?

Well, here this caseworker did it without a lick of effort and didn’t even know it.  Its amazingly easy to live forever.

This way though, its what happens, when you confuse poverty with neglect.  You live forever.

Exactly what is abuse and neglect? 

Why is it so important to define these two words?

Abuse and neglect are the defined allegations used as justification for removing children from their natural homes.

They are the acts of parents that CPS has “reason to believe”  did occur which gives them the right to remove a child from the home.

The parents are then expected to jump through hoops working their (“services”) which are outlined in the “family service plan” made to “protect”  the children from the “abuse and “neglect” …  right?

Child Protection Services. CPS – Services to Protect the Children from abuse and neglect. That is why it is so important to define Abuse & Neglect.  That is why we should not confuse poverty with neglect.

Abuse is defined as the prolonged maltreatment of another; the continued misuse of something, the mishandling thereof, the ill-handling of something.

Abuse is intentional – with forethought and deliberate action – It is causing or threatening to cause physical, mental, emotional, psychological, financial or sexual harm against a person, or a person’s beloved … (pet, family member, friend, or other loved one). Abuse is not only causing harm or injury to that person but also controlling them by placing them in fear of harm or injury against  themselves or another person.

An abuser often uses fear to control or manipulate that person into acting or performing in a certain manner bending to a will not his or her own.

Definition of Child Neglect

Child neglect is the failure to provide for the shelter, safety, supervision and nutritional needs of the child. Child neglect may be physical, educational, or emotional neglect:

  • Physical neglect includes refusal of or delay in seeking health care, abandonment, expulsion from the home or refusal to allow a runaway to return home, and inadequate supervision.
  • Educational neglect includes the allowance of chronic truancy, failure to enroll a child of mandatory school age in school, and failure to attend to a special educational need.
  • Emotional neglect includes such actions as marked inattention to the child’s needs for affection, refusal of or failure to provide needed psychological care, spouse abuse in the child’s presence, and permission of drug or alcohol use by the child.

How often is poverty confused with neglect ?   Many times.

That is why the social worker’s assessment is so valuable a tool, if used properly.  But most of the time, it is not.

The assessment identifies the services that might be able to assist a family out of a tough situation that has placed the family at risk.

Perhaps the recent loss of a job has led to hard times, and the stress has caused some issues in the parenting skills of the mother or father with their children.

Assistance with applying for financial aid, unemployment benefits, housing or food, and parenting classes, could prevent the unnecessary removal of a child from the home.

Avoiding placement in foster care when the risk is low enough that needs can be met through a service plan that keeps the family in tact, is definitely best for the family unit. So why do children enter foster care? !

Children enter foster care because of abuse and/or neglect.

The majority, however, is due to neglect, which, when neglect is a stand-alone problem (not in combination with abuse), it is often the result of inadequate housing, poor child care, or insufficient food or medical care. For example – lets take a look at poverty and an example of how it can mistakenly destroy lives with the misapplied help of CPS at its worst… so this example can remain just that – an example to learn from.

Poverty is not neglect, but the two get tied together in a tragic knot.

So if you ask the grown up little boy who could have changed it all…  he’ll tell you … He will say the social worker could have made a difference.

He says it quickly and matter of fact – Ms. Too-Busy-To-Pay Attention social worker is who could have, and should have helped. But didn’t.

Its the social worker he blames – even more than he blames his  father. Why? Because she had the training, the power, and she was in the role,that  SHOULD HAVE helped them.

Instead she failed them.

He says “her decision killed my Mom and me, we’ll never recover.”

BUT – If you ask the caseworker about the same little boy…

She will stop, and pause, and shake her head before she walks away telling you she hasn’t the time to discuss a case that was “over so long ago.”  

Besides, she could not even remember which one he was – the boy without electricity.

She laughs, “How much more vague can you be?”

She will carry on as if he never existed.  That case was 0ne of many to her. Hell, she hasn’t even worked for CPS now for years – that was only a summer job she had once.

To him, though, his case, and this social worker is everything.

She is the reason he has no home, no life, no mother, no education, no wife or children.

She is the reason he is nothing, a statistic, with no goals, no dreams, no hope, no will to live.

She is the reason he is angry with an addiction to drugs.

To him, the CPS Social Worker is a face he cannot forget.

She has the name that haunts him.

She is the woman that he seethes, day in and day out.

But to the social worker, he was a number on a file she might recall if she dug it up and looked again. Maybe.

To him, she has ripped a hole in the bond between his mother & him.

She destroyed his family unit that probably will never be repaired.

Because of her, he quits school & lives on the streets.

That’s not child protection. That’s child sabotage.

the social worker now lives forever…

to that little boy …

(c) 2009 Forever May, J.Murphy

arrest, awareness, child custody, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, crime, domestic violence, false allegations, families
CPS Used My Decision to Home School I Was Charged with Truancy

One of the reasons my child was taken into foster care4 was an allegation against me of neglecting my son’s education, and not sending him to school.  This is how they managed to pull it off.

Early on in the new semester after winter break, I received a call from the school that my ex husband was calling the district trying to find out what school my son was going to.  This was a problem because my ex was under a domestic violence protective order requiring no contact with the child.  However, it did not tell the school not to disclose the name of the child’s school he was attending; and did not specify anything else on release of records.  If he came to the school and requested a copy of the file, they would have to give it to him, and/or telling my ex the name of the school might risk my child’s safety.

I decided to home school after having heard my ex threaten to “kidnap” my son, and fearing the worst I wanted to take no chances.  I kept my son home.

I used the Abeka Books Curriculum which is a very good program that had been used at my son’s private school in Florida, based on Christian teachings.  The curriculum is highly recommended, and is more than  competent to meet standards of home schooling in Texas.

Looking back

My first mistake was not withdrawing my son from school before removing him from attendance. That created the opportunity to be counted absent, and not for medical reasons.  Although the school had been made aware, especially since they first contacted me, that there was a problem, the custody issues involved in my situation came forth when my ex had begun to dispute the legal papers I had given the school. So the school decided to hold off on allowing me to withdraw my son until the “legal team” could review my legal papers at the district level.

We went back and forth for a period of time, my son missing  several weeks of school, technically, during all of this.  Although I was teaching my son at home the school district never sent a truancy officer to visit, and they never asked for documentation.  I did inform them in writing, and kept the copies of the correspondence in my files though.

After a couple of weeks, one week being spring break, there was much confusion as to my custody status and whether I was allowed to withdraw my son, since the separate custody battle had begun with a temporary restraining order placed on me, customary when suit is filed, so that the parent doesn’t remove the child from school.  The timing had just perfectly overlapped and caused enough confusion such that the school disallowed the withdrawal until they figured it all out.

Unfortunately in my case, I had unseen forces at work, being two other parties, the child’s father and grandmother, working together, to fool the outsiders, into removing my child from my care under the guise of I was not a good mother.  This opportunity came about when I removed him from school (out of fear he would be kidnapped) that they could say I didn’t care about his education and didn’t get him to school.  Of course if you compare it to her allegation that he lived with her at the same time (for the six months prior) you start to see the holes in the story, but with so many cases in the family courts who has time to truly look at the big picture when the immediate case can be stamped and moved along.

Another mishap that I didn’t realise had occured was when the school then sent a notice by certified mail to me  that they would be filing charges against me if I did not blah blah blah since I never got the letter, I don’t exactly know what it said.  The address they had on file had been my child’s grandmother’s address & not mine.   BIG MISTAKE.

I had recently moved to Texas on what was possibly meant to be a temporary basis, and was not sure where my son and I would stay for any length of time, so initially, in order to get my son back in school expeditiously, we used her address when I moved out of my brother’s house where we had been staying.

I forgot to change it or clarify anything regarding the address in the midst of the chaos at the time that caused me to fear sending my son to school in the first place; I should have done that immediately when I moved.

Again, in hindsight, that turned into another problem that played a huge role in my nightmare.  The other huge mistake of mine was relying on the deal I had worked out with the child’s grandmother, that he was picked up in the afternoons by her from school.  Normally, a grandmother picking up a child to keep until Mom or Dad get home seems perfectly acceptable; except when the grandmother has malicious intent. Although my son was brought to me once I returned home from work in the early evenings, it opened up for another opportunity for nefarious behavior on the grandmother’s part in order to secure her standing against me in court.

Since my son carpooled to school with his cousin, usually driven by my sister-in-law, I was rarely seen at the school on either morning dropoff or afternoon pickup.  This ultimately hurt my standing in court when it had been alleged that my son lived with the grandmother for six months prior to the filing of the case (a requirement by law before bringing suit against me in court for custody) in order to prove he lived with her, she could then used the schools’ familiarity with her being there with my son as proof, or evidence via witnesses and the teachers and school staff were easily fooled because they saw her with my son in the afternoons and not me.  This created ample collateral witnesses, and since CPS loves to use the public school as a place to interview and take children, it was very convenient for them as well in building a case.  I was working at a flower shop in the afternoons but my son was living with me even though the school thought he didn’t (unbeknownst to me).  I didn’t realise at the time that there was any such misunderstanding.  That’s the way they wanted it to be.

I was charged with four counts of Failure to Abide By Compulsory Attendance Laws which pretty much means pay a fine and get your child’s butt to school.

That’s when the worst doesn’t happen. In my case, it did.

So having sent my notice to the wrong address it allowed for the opportunity for the child’s grandmother to then sign for it but not tell me about it. Thus, i didn’t find out until too late, and I was charged after I missed the deadline to do whatever the letter  said – I believe it was to return my son to school in full attendance or face charges.  I missed the deadline, unknowingly, as my arch enemy and my exhusband both chuckled quietly at the sinister mail follies in their diabolical plan that was coming together beautifully.

According to school files, they had a signed certified letter  that I received notice from the school notifying me of the deadline to act in compliance or else.  It appeared that I ignored the notice after receiving it and signing for it, and thus, did not care about my child’s education.  Perfect for CPS to grab hold and run.

Prior to being adjudicated in court on the charges CPS used the fact that I had been CHARGED with truancy related accusations (not convicted when they did this, mind you…)  in order to justify removing my child from my home.

I wrote many letters to the school during this entire process.  Although my charges were ultimately dropped, the fact remained my son was taken away from me and the mere allegations allowed them one of several doors to walk through when coming up with ways to justify the removal of my son.

Remember – neglectful supervision is very elastic of a term, and almost anything can fit it.  If CPS wants a child, they can use neglectful supervision to take that child, then, if the facts don’t match the theory, change the fact.

Several years later, looking at the records online, I found the name of the charges they filed against me actually are listed as something else – Parent Contributing to Nonattendance.  Sounds a little more derogatory in my opinion.  How they can just change what the person is charged with years later on record is beyond my comprehension, but disposition states Dismissed due to bad identification.  Anyone know what that means? Email me and let me know.

So I hope this serves to at least warn you to be careful with your decision to home school and make sure you document all contact and dealings, follow the law and all procedures, and document it all.  That was if you do find yourself in a nightmare situation, you may be able to overturn it, or hopefully avoid it all together.

Good luck!

accountability, awareness, child, children, cps, education, families, family, foster care, government, home, law, legal, social workers
CPS v. Home Schoolers… FAQ on Dealing With School District

HOME SCHOOLING PARENTS v. CPS

Truancy laws are very often used by CPS so its a good idea to be familiar with what could happen.

If you are homeschooling in Texas, it might be a good idea to be familiar with what you could be up against when it comes to CPS and your child’s education.  Many home schoolers find themselves being accused of truancy when they are being schooled at home.

So before you find yourself being charged with Parental Failure to Abide by the Compulsory Attendance Laws, followed by Neglectful Supervision, here’s a FAQ sheet on DEALING WITH THE SCHOOL DISTRICT.

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This article is reprinted from the Handbook for Texas Home Schoolers published by the Texas Home School Coalition Association and may be copied only in its entirety, including this paragraph of credit and information. The Handbook for Texas Home Schoolers is a manual for home educators in Texas that includes information about where to find curricula; the laws in Texas; the how-to’s of home schooling; graduation; national, state, regional, and local organizations; and samples of letters referenced in this article. It can be purchased from the Texas Home School Coalition Association at PO Box 6747, Lubbock, TX 79493, for $20 (includes tax and shipping). For more information, contact the THSC Association at (806) 744-4441, staff@thsc.org, or www.thsc.org.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS when dealing with the school district.

  • I have decided to home school. What do I need to do? My child is enrolled in public school.

The first thing you need to do is obtain a curriculum. It is wise to find a local support group to help you set up your school.

Although you are not legally required to contact the school district, chances are very high that you will receive a visit from an attendance officer if you simply remove your child. Therefore, once you have a curriculum in hand, write the principal of the school your child attends and tell him that you are withdrawing your child to teach him at home. If the school contacts you and says that you must do more (come to the central office, fill out a form, or something else along those lines), do not go to the school. Your reply should be that if they will provide their request to you in writing, you will be glad to respond. If you receive a request of any kind, you are only required to give them a simple letter of assurance.

  • How many days per year must we have school?

The Texas Education Code requires that public schools meet 180 days per year; public school students must attend 170 days/year. This applies to public schools only. Home schools in Texas are private schools and the state of Texas does not regulate the number of days per year that private schools must be in session or the number of days a student must attend.

  • How many hours a day must we conduct school?

Home schools in Texas are private schools and are not regulated by the state. No minimum hours are required. You will probably find that your student can accomplish more work in the same period of time than public school child if for no other reason than because of not having to stand in line, wait for roll call, and the like.

  • May someone else homeschool my child?

Yes. Home schools in Texas have been determined by the Texas Supreme Court to be private schools. Private schools are not regulated by the state of Texas. There are no requirements such as teacher certification or curriculum approval. The ruling of the Leeper case states that a parent “or one standing in parental authority” may educate a child. However, if a person is teaching more than three students outside her family, she may encounter problems with local zoning ordinances, and the state may require that she be licensed for childcare.

  • May my child participate in classes at the public school?

That is a local school decision. It is possible for a public school to allow this, but it is not likely at this time. The rules are somewhat different for special needs students; check with your local district.

  • May my child participate in extracurricular activities at the public school?

At this time, a local public school could allow your child to play in the band or other such activities; however, he would not be able to take part in events sponsored by the University Interscholastic League (UIL) such as athletic competitions or band and choir contests.

  • What is the compulsory school age requirement?

A child who is age six as of September 1 of the current school year must be enrolled in school until his eighteenth birthday, unless he has graduated. 16. What about testing my child? Although the state of Texas does not require testing of private school students, many home school parents do give their children annual tests using nationally-normed achievement tests.

  • May my child go out in public during the day? What if someone questions him about why he is not in school?

Home schools in Texas are private schools. Home school parents are law-abiding citizens and should not feel the need to hide their children during the day. If someone asks you or your child why he is not in school, you should respond that you home educate and that you have already accomplished your work for the day or that you are on a school field trip. You should be aware that if your children are seen during public school hours you will generate questions. If your child is in public without you and your city has a daytime curfew, you could encounter difficulties.

  • What happens if my child wants to enter or re-enter public school?

School districts set the requirements for enrollment in their schools. This is a local decision–not one made by the state of Texas. You should check with the local school district concerning its policy regarding accepting unaccredited private school students.

  • What is required for graduation?

Home schools in Texas are private schools and not regulated by the state; therefore, just as with other private schools, home schools set their own graduation standards. There is no minimum age requirement for graduation.

  • How can my child receive a diploma?

When a student meets the requirements set by his school for graduation (see question #19), he may receive a diploma. Diplomas may be ordered from the Texas Home School Coalition Association and other sources.

  • What if I work?

Remember that home schools are private schools and there is no requirement for hours or the time when education must take place. The only requirement is that a written curriculum covering the basic areas (see question #3) must be pursued in a bona fide (not a sham) manner. Consequently, one could work and teach his child as well. While this would be difficult and take some discipline, it is certainly possible and legal.

  • Is there a recurring theme here?

The answer is “yes”! Home schools in Texas are private schools. Private schools in Texas are not regulated. Therefore, home schools in Texas are not regulated. Keep this thought central in your mind when dealing with those who want to regulate or restrict your freedom to teach your children.

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child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, education, family, General, government, law, system failure
ALERT:: Collin & Dallas Counties Ignore Domestic Violence Outcries

August 16, 2008 at 12:29 am

VICTIM OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SEEKS HELP

SHE IS IN DANGER AND NEEDS HELP

COLLIN AND DALLAS COUNTIES IGNORE HER SO SHE TURNS TO ITS ALMOST TUESDAY FOR HELP!!

(The comments below were made by a woman on Its Almost Tuesday’s main page, I copy/paste for you all to see)

I am going through almost exactly what Mary has gone through in the Collin County Court System. I feel for her and broke-down several times while reading about her story. I have been a victim of Domestic Violence to my husband, the abuser who has beat & battered me throughout our marriage. There are at least thirty (30) Police Incidents and i finally obtained a Protective Order that Collin County will not enforce because they say it is out of there jurisdiction and that I need to see the City of Dallas. Likewise, the City of Dallas says that it is out of there jurisdiction and that the constable of Collin County is the one to enforce these Protective Order Matters. Collin County says thay dont know what Dallas is talking about. I pay taxes to both. Neither one is helping me and my husband is continuing to take steps to follow-through on his threats to kill me. Something needs to be done, but I don’t know where to turn.

CONTACT US IF YOU CAN HELP