Category: education

child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, family, foster care, General, government, statistics, system failure
Sadly, Statistics Say So….
    • Every day more than 3 children die as a result of abuse and neglect. Over 75% of the child abuse fatalities were children under the age of 5.

    • Children who have been abused experience anxiety, depression, poor self-esteem, substance abuse, and even worse many contemplate or attempt suicide.

    • Over 50% of foster youth become juvenile delinquents and furthermore, commit violent crimes as adults. Studies conducted in prisons have shown that over 50% of the inmates had spent some point of their life in the foster care or juvenile system.

    • Roughly 50% of foster youth do not complete high school.

    Sources:

    California Department of Social Services Research Development Division
    UC Berkeley Center for Social Services Research

    What and How Many Children Are In American Foster Care?

    On September 30, 2004, 518,000 children were in our country’s foster care system. Most children are placed in foster care temporarily due to parental abuse or neglect.

    Average Length of Stay in Foster Care
    The average length of stay for a foster child is 2½ years. However, this figure does not include subsequent re-entries into foster care.

    Age of Children in Foster Care

    Average age: 10.1 years

    Age

    Percentage

    Younger than 1 year

    5%

    Age 1-5

    25%

    Age 6-10 years

    20%

    Age 11-15 years

    29%

    Age 16-18 years

    18%

    Over 18

    2%

    Race and Ethnicity

    As a percentage, there are more children of color in the foster care system than in the general U.S. population. Child abuse and neglect, however, occur at about the same rate in all racial and ethnic groups.

    Ethnicity

    Foster Care

    General Population

    Black, Non-Hispanic

    34%

    15%

    White, Non-Hispanic

    40%

    61%

    Hispanic

    18%

    17%

    American Indian/Alaska Native, Non-

    Hispanic

    2%

    1%

    Asian/Pacific Islander, Non-Hispanic

    1%

    3%

    Unknown

    2%

    N/A

    Two or More Races, Non-Hispanic

    2%

    4%

    Gender

    Gender

    Percentage

    Male

    53%

    Female

    47%

    Foster Homes

    In 2002, there were 170,000 foster homes nationwide.

    Adoptions

    In 2004, 59% of adopted children were adopted by their foster parents. Of children adopted in 2004, 24% were adopted by a relative.

    What Happens to Children Who Leave Foster Care as Young Adults?

    Each year, an estimated 20,000 young people age out of the U.S. foster care system. Many are only 18 years old and still need support and services. Several foster care alumni studies show that without a lifelong connection to a caring adult, these older youth often are left vulnerable to a host of adverse situations:

    Outcome

    Percentage

    Earned a high school diploma

    54%

    Obtained college bachelors degree or higher

    2%

    Became a parent 12-18 months after discharge

    84%

    Were unemployed

    51%

    Had no health insurance

    30%

    Had been homeless

    25%

    Received public assistance

    30%

    *The above information was provided courtesy of the Child Welfare League of America. For more information contact: Child Welfare League of America, 2345 Crystal Drive, Suite 250, Arlington, VA 22002, or cwla.org.

    ChildStats.Gov::

    America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2007 is one in a series of annual reports to the Nation on the condition of children in America. In this restructured report, three background measures describe the changing population of children and provide demographic context and 38 indicators depict the well-being of children in the areas of family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. Highlights from each section of the report follow.

    Demographic Background

    • In 2006, there were 73.7 million children ages 0–17 in the United States, or 25 percent of the population, down from a peak of 36 percent at the end of the “baby boom” (1964). Children are projected to compose 24 percent of the population in 2020.
    • Racial and ethnic diversity continues to increase over time. In 2006, 58 percent of U.S. children were White, non-Hispanic; 20 percent were Hispanic; 15 percent were Black; 4 percent were Asian; and 4 percent were all other races. The percentage of children who are Hispanic has increased faster than that of any other racial or ethnic group, growing from 9 percent of the child population in 1980 to 20 percent in 2006.

    Family and Social Environment

    • In 2006, 67 percent of children ages 0–17 lived with two married parents, down from 77 percent in 1980.
    • The nonmarital birth rate in 2005 increased to 48 per 1,000 unmarried women ages 15–44 years, up from 46 in 2004. The recent increases in nonmarital birth rates have been especially notable among women age 25 and older. Births to unmarried women constituted 37 percent of all U.S. births, the highest level ever reported.
    • In 2005, 20 percent of school-age children spoke a language other than English at home and 5 percent of school-age children had difficulty speaking English.
    • The adolescent birth rate for females ages 15–17 continued to decline in 2005. The rate fell by more than two-fifths since 1991, reaching 21 births per 1,000 females ages 15–17 in 2005. The 2004–2005 decline was particularly steep among Black, non-Hispanic and Asian or Pacific Islander adolescents. The birth rate for Black, non-Hispanic adolescents dropped three-fifths during 1991–2005.
    • In 2005, there were 12 substantiated reports of child maltreatment per 1,000 children.

    Economic Circumstances

    • In 2005, 18 percent of all children ages 0–17 lived in poverty; among children living in families, the poverty rate was 17 percent.
    • The percentage of children in families living below the federal poverty threshold has fluctuated since the early 1980s: it reached a high of 22 percent in 1993 and decreased to a low of 16 percent in 2000.
    • The percentage of children who had at least one parent working year round, full time rose from 77.6 percent in 2004 to 78.3 percent in 2005.

    Health Care

    • In 2005, 89 percent of children had health insurance coverage at some point during the year, down from 90 percent in 2004.
    • In 2005, 48 percent of children ages 2–4 had a dental visit in the past year, compared with 84 percent of children ages 5–11 and 82 percent of children ages 12–17. In 2003–2004, 23 percent of children ages 2–5 and 14 percent of children ages 6–17 had untreated dental caries (cavities) upon dental examination.

    Physical Environment and Safety

    • In 2005, 60 percent of children lived in counties in which concentrations of one or more air pollutants rose above allowable levels.
    • The percentage of children served by community drinking water systems that did not meet all applicable health based standards declined from 20 percent in 1993 to about 8 percent in 1998. From 1998 to 2005 the percentage has fluctuated between 5 and 10 percent.
    • In 2001–2004, about 1 percent of children ages 1–5 had elevated blood lead levels [greater than or equal to 10 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL)]. The median blood lead concentration for children ages 1–5 dropped from 14 µg/dL in 1976–1980 to about 2 µg/dL in 2003–2004.
    • In 2005, 40 percent of households with children had one or more housing problems, up from 37 percent in 2003. The most common type of housing problem is cost burden, followed by physically inadequate housing and crowded housing.
    • In 2004, the injury death rate for children ages 1–4 was 13 deaths per 100,000 children.
    • The leading causes of injury-related emergency department visits among adolescents ages 15–19 in 2003–2004 were being struck by or against an object (33 visits per 1,000 children), motor vehicle traffic crashes (25 visits per 1,000 children), and falls (20 visits per 1,000 children). Together, these causes of injury accounted for half of all injury-related emergency department visits for this age group.

    Behavior

    • The percentages of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students reporting illicit drug use in the past 30 days remained stable from 2005 to 2006. However, past month use among all three grades significantly declined since 1997.
    • In 2005, 47 percent of high school students reported ever having had sexual intercourse. This was statistically the same rate as in 2003 and a decline from 54 percent in 1991.

    Education

    • The percentage of children ages 3–5 not yet in kindergarten who were read to daily by a family member was higher in 2005 than in 1993 (60 versus 53 percent). A greater percentage of White, non-Hispanic and Asian children were read to daily in 2005 than were Black, non-Hispanic, or Hispanic children (68 and 66 percent, compared with 50 and 45 percent, respectively).
    • Between 1982 and 2004, the percentage of high school graduates who had completed an advanced mathematics course almost doubled, increasing from 26 to 50 percent. Likewise, the percentage of graduates who had completed a physics, chemistry, or advanced biology course almost doubled, increasing from 35 to 68 percent.
    • In 2005, 69 percent of high school completers enrolled immediately in a 2- or 4-year college. This rate was not statistically different than the historic high of 67 percent reached in 2004.

    Health

    • The percentage of infants with low birthweight was 8.2 percent in 2005, up from 7.9 percent in 2003 and 8.1 percent in 2004 and has increased slowly but steadily since 1984 (6.7 percent).
    • In 2005, 5 percent of children ages 4–17 were reported by a parent to have serious (definite or severe) emotional or behavioral difficulties. Among the parents of these children, 81 percent reported contacting a health care provider or school staff about their child’s difficulties, 40 percent reported their child was prescribed medication for their difficulties, and 47 percent reported their child had received treatment other than medication.
    • The proportion of children ages 6–17 who were overweight increased from 6 percent in 1976–1980 to 11 percent in 1988–1994 and continued to rise to 18 percent in 2003–2004.
    • In 2005, about 9 percent of children ages 0–17 were reported to currently have asthma, and about 5 percent of children had one or more asthma attacks in the previous year. The prevalence of asthma in children is particularly high among Black, non-Hispanic and Puerto Rican children (13 and 20 percent, respectively)
  • child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, General, government, rape, system failure
    Foster care provider Lawrence Bright is a predator
    Default Foster care provider Lawrence Bright is a predator

    Police say 70-year-old Lawrence Bright was a licensed foster care provider, and a persistent predator.

    He lived with his girlfriend in this house on Pinnacle Road in Henrietta. There, they cared for several foster children, including the alleged victim.

    She told investigators the abuse began in 2002 when she was 13 years old….and continued for four years. She said bright raped her five times a week.

    She told investigators that her foster-mother was suspicious, but that Bright went to great lengths to hide the abuse.

    She also hid the abuse, telling investigators that she lied to caseworkers, to keep things steady at home.

    She did have moments of resistance, telling investigators that at one point she asked if they could stop, but he said he couldn’t, that he, “needed to get as much in before he died.”

    And it’s possible she wasn’t Bright’s only victim. She told police that another of his foster children told her that he was having sex with her as well. On that, police wouldn’t comment.

    http://rochesterhomepage.net/content…ext/?cid=15518

    arrests, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, family, foster care, government, medical, pornography
    Pfizer Global Patent Director’s Child Pornography Charges

    Pfizer Global Patent Director’s Child Pornography Charges

    U.S. V. ALAN HESKETH (U.S. Dist. Ct., Conn., March 28, 2008) – In newly-released documents, Pfizer’s Global Patent Director was charged with trading child pornography images with another criminal suspect. According to the criminal complaint, he allegedly accessed the computer account used for such activity while at Pfizer headquarters in New York City, a hotel, and his home in Connecticut.

    Click here to view the actual court documents in this case.

    (WARNING: EXPLICIT CONTENT DO NOT VIEW IF YOU ARE SENSITIVE TO EXPLICIT OR SEXUAL MATERIAL OR IF YOU ARE UNDER 21 YEARS OF AGE)

    child welfare reform, foster care abuse, collin county, cps, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, government, healing, missing child, system failure
    Collin County Father Talks to Its Almost Tuesday

    I received an email from the Collin County father asking me to let you all know that they have a full feature film coming out, all proceeds go to their children in a trust fund.

    He says they are still fighting to get them back thru the court system in Collin County Texas. They have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to fix this very flawed cps system.

    He says, “We know we can not change what happened to our family. We hope we will be able to help other families in the future.”

    With that in mind, “any other families from Collin County Texas that have been thrown into the Collin County CPS system, or who have beecn ordered to take parenting classes, domestic abuse classes, psycological examanations, anger management classes etc when found not guilty or ruled out for abuse, please contact Its Almost Tuesday.

    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, false allegations, government, healing, missing child, system failure
    High court ruling is victory for victims of child abuse in Hawaii

    The state Supreme Court has upheld an award to be paid by the state to a Maui girl whose previous injury was under investigation by Child Protective Services.

    Child Protective Services has been told by the state Supreme Court that it is responsible for the welfare of children subject to abuse. A $1.1 million judgment was upheld last month by the high court and will hold the agency accountable for future negligence.

    The state should increase expenditures for the agency rather than be forced to pay court awards.

    The case arose from “very critical” injuries, including broken bones, a torn intestine, severe bruises and bleeding inside the skull, suffered by a 21/2-year-old Maui girl seven years ago, two months after being brought to Maui Memorial Medical Center with a broken leg. Dasia Morales-Kahoohanohano was under the care of her mother, Denise Morales, when the injuries occurred.

    A pediatrician at the hospital had told CPS social worker Ellen Brewerton after the first injury that he did not believe her mother harmed the girl and that “the only logical explanation was Denise’s boyfriend (did).” Morales was arrested but neither she nor her then-boyfriend, Darryl Ramos, was prosecuted.

    The social worker allowed the weekly exchange in custody between Morales and Dasia’s father, Jarrett Kahoohanohano, to resume on the condition that Dasia not be brought to Ramos’ house. Maui police had informed CPS that Ramos had been convicted of crimes seven times, including household abuse for punching a former girlfriend and biting her nose.

    Brewerton went on a two-week vacation five weeks after the broken-leg incident and three days after Ramos and a friend were arrested following a shooting on the Ramos property, but the case was not assigned to another social worker during that fortnight. Dasia’s severe injuries occurred at the Ramos house a week after Brewerton returned to work.

    Lillian Koller, director of the Human Services Department, called the Supreme Court’s decision “unfair to Hawaii taxpayers” and “exasperating for our social workers, whose conduct may be condemned no matter what they do.” Vlad Devens, attorney for Dasia, her father and paternal grandfather, suggested the injuries could have been prevented if the CPS had adhered to its own policies.

    The court’s unanimous landmark decision does not mean that any injury to a child under CPS’s oversight will end up in court. It does mean that any departure from policy leading to injury can be grounds for a lawsuit.

    As Circuit Judge Joel E. August ruled in the case, and the Supreme Court agreed, “DHS’s duty to protect children exists once they are on notice that a significant and unjustifiable or unexplained injury has occurred to a child that is brought to their attention, and there is a reasonable opportunity to verify the injury or the potential risk of future harm.”

    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, education, false allegations, government, healing, missing child, system failure
    High court ruling is victory for victims of child abuse in Hawaii

    The state Supreme Court has upheld an award to be paid by the state to a Maui girl whose previous injury was under investigation by Child Protective Services.

    Child Protective Services has been told by the state Supreme Court that it is responsible for the welfare of children subject to abuse. A $1.1 million judgment was upheld last month by the high court and will hold the agency accountable for future negligence.

    The state should increase expenditures for the agency rather than be forced to pay court awards.

    The case arose from “very critical” injuries, including broken bones, a torn intestine, severe bruises and bleeding inside the skull, suffered by a 21/2-year-old Maui girl seven years ago, two months after being brought to Maui Memorial Medical Center with a broken leg. Dasia Morales-Kahoohanohano was under the care of her mother, Denise Morales, when the injuries occurred.

    A pediatrician at the hospital had told CPS social worker Ellen Brewerton after the first injury that he did not believe her mother harmed the girl and that “the only logical explanation was Denise’s boyfriend (did).” Morales was arrested but neither she nor her then-boyfriend, Darryl Ramos, was prosecuted.

    The social worker allowed the weekly exchange in custody between Morales and Dasia’s father, Jarrett Kahoohanohano, to resume on the condition that Dasia not be brought to Ramos’ house. Maui police had informed CPS that Ramos had been convicted of crimes seven times, including household abuse for punching a former girlfriend and biting her nose.

    Brewerton went on a two-week vacation five weeks after the broken-leg incident and three days after Ramos and a friend were arrested following a shooting on the Ramos property, but the case was not assigned to another social worker during that fortnight. Dasia’s severe injuries occurred at the Ramos house a week after Brewerton returned to work.

    Lillian Koller, director of the Human Services Department, called the Supreme Court’s decision “unfair to Hawaii taxpayers” and “exasperating for our social workers, whose conduct may be condemned no matter what they do.” Vlad Devens, attorney for Dasia, her father and paternal grandfather, suggested the injuries could have been prevented if the CPS had adhered to its own policies.

    The court’s unanimous landmark decision does not mean that any injury to a child under CPS’s oversight will end up in court. It does mean that any departure from policy leading to injury can be grounds for a lawsuit.

    As Circuit Judge Joel E. August ruled in the case, and the Supreme Court agreed, “DHS’s duty to protect children exists once they are on notice that a significant and unjustifiable or unexplained injury has occurred to a child that is brought to their attention, and there is a reasonable opportunity to verify the injury or the potential risk of future harm.”

    child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, divorce, domestic violence, education, false allegations, family, foster care, government, healing, system failure
    How many more in Collin County Texas? Let us know…

    I would like to comment on the article I posted Disgusted with the system: cbs11tv.com – North Texas Man Fighting For Custody Of His Kids

    and thank the blogger who originally posted it, Louise, whose blog Disgusted With The System, is one of my favorites.

    Collin County, Texas seems to have a trend in their cases with CPS and the social services system. I have on my site, alone, 3 cases from Collin County, and I know there are more.

    I’d love to hear from you if you have a case you’d like published on my blog or if you have any questions or comments.

    If you want to privately send me email you can do so at itsalmosttuesday@gmail.com

    Thank you to everyone who supports our children and families, preserving the parents right to be a parent.

    child death, child welfare reform, foster care abuse, cps, divorce, domestic violence, education, family, foster care, government, healing, missing child, system failure
    FLORIDA Child Protection Agency spokesman faces child-porn charges

    Article published Feb 5, 2008
    DCF to review personnel records
    Agency spokesman faces child-porn charges
    The head of the Department of Children and Families, “horrified and shocked” by the arrest of his agency spokesman on child-pornography charges, Monday ordered a review of personnel records for all DCF employees.

    DCF Secretary Bob Butterworth and Florida Department of Law Enforcement Commissioner Gerald Bailey briefed reporters at DCF headquarters about the arrest of Al Zimmerman on eight counts of soliciting two boys for sexual purposes.

    Butterworth, who fired Zimmerman last Friday, said he sent a message to all department employees — urging them to “work with your heads held high” — and said the incident does not reflect on DCF’s work in protecting children in foster care, the elderly and other needy Floridians.

    “There are certain things you can’t prepare for. I guarantee you, this is one thing I never expected to occur,” he said. “It is one person who committed, I believe, a horrific act — a horrific act — and therefore not only victimized his victims, but victimized this department, the media and the 13,500 people who work here.”

    Butterworth and Bailey said one of the two teenage boys in the Zimmerman case had been in DCF care. Bailey said “there were indications” that Zimmerman might have met a boy through agency services, but both men declined to go into details for fear of giving any information that might identify one of the victims even by inference.

    Butterworth said Zimmerman had no access to DCF computer systems.

    Bailey, representing Attorney General Bill McCollum at the briefing, said the FBI has seized Zimmerman’s office and home computers, to see if he distributed any child pornography. Bailey said “there are indications that at least one victim was met through his job” but that Zimmerman’s access to DCF records “was limited.”

    “I know of two victims at this point. There may be others,” said Bailey. “That’s what the continuing investigation will confirm or deny.”

    He credited the Tampa Police Department, FBI and McCollum’s office for working with FDLE in the case. Bailey also said DCF gave “complete and open cooperation.”

    Butterworth said the DCF personnel staff will first check records of all employees hired under the new policy to make sure required background checks and fingerprints are on file. Then they will check everyone else.

    “After we do all those after 2006, November, we will go backwards and hand-go-through each and every file of the 13,500 employees to make sure that everything there is also there as required by policy,” he said. “I want to make sure that our policies are being followed in all cases. I want to make sure the background check is there in the file.”

    Butterworth said DCF policies before November of 2006 did not require fingerprinting of employees. Zimmerman, a former TV newsman in the Tampa Bay area, was hired in 2005 and Butterworth said that although he had “glowing endorsements” from two references — public-information aides for a police agency and a fire department — none of his former employers was contacted.